Guest Post: Atole

Hello lovely readers of StateEats! I’m Chrissy, known to most as Chrissy, to others CB, my family Lulubelle and to my readers, The Hungary Buddha. I’m so happy to be guest posting for Kat and Kloh. As they’ve been cooking their way around the U.S., I’ve been cooking my way around the world, and it was not lost on either of us that there is a ton of overlap between the two ideas. After all, our country is indeed a nation of immigrants, and there are little reminders of the old world from whence they came in every bite we take.

Kat asked me to share a recipe for atole, and I’m more than happy to do so because it’s breakfast! And I love breakfast! Plus, it’s perfect for this time of the year when the weather is oh so cold and frightful.

Atole

For some background, I grew up eating a hot, freshly prepared breakfast every weekday morning. #Spoiled. Once in a while we had cereal, but more often than not we had pancakes, french toast, quiche, cheesy toast, cream of wheat, crepes, wheatena…the list goes on. Atole, a warm cornmeal drink with central Mexican and central American origins, would have fit seamlessly in my childhood morning rotation and get me started on the right foot. Especially popular for breakfast, it is also consumed for special occasions, namely on el dia de los meuetos (Day of the Dead) or at Christmas time with chocolate (called champurrado). Because it’s made in the same manner as oatmeal or cream of wheat, it can be as thin or as thick as you like, making it either more drink-like or porridge-like.

I opted for the latter, and I boiled my atole to medium thickness. However, for a gluten-free breakfast on the go, opt for a thinner, more coffee-cup portable version.

Atole

To make the champurrado (chocolate atole), add 2 ounces of chopped Mexican chocolate into the recipe below.

Atole

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 15 min.
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  •  1 ¼ cup almond milk (or other dairy variety)
  • 1 ¼ cup water
  • 1/4 cup masa harina
  • 2 TB brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • Almonds, to garnish and add crunch (optional)

Instructions

Whisk the milk, water, masa, sugar and cinnamon in a medium saucepan until smooth.  Place the pan over medium heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to medium-low and stir until it reaches desired thickness, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in vanilla and serve in mugs or bowls.

Note: To make the champurrado (chocolate atole), add 2 ounces of chopped Mexican chocolate into the recipe above.

 

 

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Guest Post: Atole”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s