All posts by stateeats

New Jersey Sloppy Joes

When you think of a Sloppy Joe, you probably imagine ground beef in a sweet tomato sauce. This is not that. New Jersey Sloppy Joes are a completely different animal. Town Hall Deli in South Orange

New Jersey Sloppy Joes

created this sandwich in 1935 and it came via Havana, Cuba. Seems the mayor of Maplewood, N.J. visited Sloppy Joe’s bar (a frequent hangout of Ernest Hemingway) and liked a kind of club sandwich they made there. The mayor came back home and persuaded the owners of Town Hall to recreate the sammie for their deli. It’s been on the menu ever since.

The key to this creation is thin sliced rye bread. You don’t want the bread to overwhelm the fillings. Originally this sandwich was made with beef tongue, but now is more often made with ham, roast beef, or corned beef, along with turkey. The crunch from the slaw and the savory/sweet flavors of the Russian dressing make this sandwich a mouthwatering delight.

Check out the Exit Zero Jazz Festival April 20-22 in Cape May where you can hear teenage prodigy Joey Alexander, a jazz pianist.

New Jersey Sloppy Joes

  • Servings: 2 sandwiches
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 6 slices rye bread, ends cut off and trimmed into rectangles
  • 2-3 ounces deli ham, corned beef, or roast beef
  • 2-3 ounces deli turkey
  • 2 ounces swiss cheese
  • Cole slaw
  • Russian dressing

Instructions

Lay 2 slices of bread on work surface. On each slice, layer a quarter of the meat and cheese, then a generous dollop of coleslaw and Russian dressing. Add another slice of bread and then repeat with another layer of meat, cheese, cole slaw, and Russian dressing. Top with bread and secure with a toothpick.

Advertisements

Homemade Oatmeal Sandwiches – Tennessee

One of the country’s most iconic brands is Little Debbie snacks and one of its best- selling varieties is the Oatmeal Cream Pie. Founder O.D. McKee started his operation selling snack cakes out of the back

Oatmeal Sandwich cookie

 

of his car during the Depression. They later moved the operation into a bakery, but the business didn’t really take off until 1960 when they began selling family packs with the image of granddaughter Debbie on the box. Based in Collegedale, Tennessee, this family-run company has sold 157 billion snack cakes since that time.

This recipe is a super close recreation of their most famous variety of snack cake. There are quite a few ingredients but the cookies come together fairly quickly. Watch your baking time as you want the cookie to remain soft rather than crunchy.

Believe it or not, Nashville is home to a full-sized replica of Athens’ Parthenon. Originally built for Tennessee’s 1897 Centennial Exhibition, the building now serves as Nashville’s art museum. Don’t miss 42-foot sculpture of Greek goddess Athena inside.

 

Homemade Oatmeal Sandwiches

  • Servings: 15 sandwiches
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 cup old fashioned oats, whizzed in food processor
  • 1 ¾ cups flour
  • 2 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup butter, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup shortening
  • 1 ¼ cups sugar
  • 2 tablespoons molasses
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • Marshmallow cream (for filling)

Instructions

In a medium mixing bowl, combine all dry ingredients (oats through cinnamon). Set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer, using the paddle attachment, cream together the butter, shortening, sugar and molasses until light and fluffy. Add eggs, and then vanilla. Gradually add in dry ingredients. Mix until just combined. Line baking sheets with parchment paper or silpat. Place about 2 tablespoons of dough per cookie (for 30 cookies), leaving 2-3 inches of space between cookies to allow for spreading. Bake at 350 degrees for 8-10 minutes (do not over bake). Let sit for 2-3 minutes before removing to a wire rack to completely cool.

To assemble into sandwiches, spread approximately 2 tablespoons marshmallow cream on one cookie. Place another cookie on top.

Pears with Blue Cheese and Prosciutto – Iowa

Iowa’s most famous product, Maytag blue cheese has been in business since 1941. Still a family farm at its roots, the Maytags are in their fourth generation of making cheese.

If you need a quick and delicious appetizer you cannot go wrong with this recipe. If it takes you longer than 20 minutes to put

An easy and elegant appetizer made with Maytag blue cheese, Iowa's most famous product

together, you are doing something wrong. The sweet pears play nicely with the sharp cheese and the saltiness of the prosciutto. Molto bene!

Brucemore, in Cedar Rapids, was built in 1886 by the Sinclair family for their large brood. You can tour this 19th century mansion and learn about the lions (yes, lions in Iowa!) later families kept as pets.

Pears with Blue Cheese and Prosciutto

  • Servings: 16 pieces
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 2 ripe pears
  • Maytag blue cheese
  • 8 slices prosciutto, sliced in half lengthwise
  • Arugula

Instructions

With a sharp paring knife, quarter each pear, removing stem and core. Cut each quarter in half. Slice cheese into 16 equal pieces. Place cheese on side of pear, add a few sprigs of arugula, then wrap prosciutto around the entire piece. Repeat with remaining pears. Serve immediately.    

Maple Cinnamon Walnut Meringues – Vermont

Vermont leads the states in producing maple syrup and the Green Mountain State also has designated your favorite pancake topping

Maple Cinnamon Walnut Meringues - Vermontas the official state flavor. Early spring is sugaring time in the state; the warmer days and still-cool nights cause the maple sap to flow.

We loved the flavors of this meringue cookie. Because there is no flour, this recipe is ideal for those avoiding gluten but who still want Maple Cinnamon Walnut Meringue - Vermont something sweet after dinner. Don’t be intimated by the amount of time these take, most of it is hands off. You then leave the meringues in the oven overnight until they get crunchy.

 If you want to see how maple syrup gets made, check out the Open House Weekend, March 24-25, 2018, when sugarhouses across the state give tours, demos and samples.

Maple Cinnamon Walnut Meringues

  • Servings: 12-24
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 4 egg whites
  • 3/4 cup maple syrup
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • Salt for topping
  • Cinnamon for topping

Instructions

In the bowl of a stand mixer, add egg whites, maple syrup, cream of tartar and salt. With the whisk attachment and on medium high speed, whip ingredients for 5-7 minutes or until meringue is firm and glossy and can hold its shape. With a wooden spoon, gently fold in cinnamon, taking care not to break up the egg whites.

On a two baking sheets lined with parchment paper, portion out the meringues (recipe will make 24 small or 12 large meringues). Top each meringue with chopped walnuts, then dust with additional cinnamon and a pinch of salt.

Bake at 200 degrees for 2 hours, rotating the baking sheets occasionally. At this point, the meringues will still be a bit soft. Turn off oven and let them remain inside, preferably overnight or until meringues are crunchy.

Irish Potato Candy – Pennsylvania

Break out your green sweater and practice your Irish step dance moves, it’s almost St. Patrick’s Day. And what better way to

Irish Potato Candy - Pennsylvaniacelebrate than by making these cute candies that look like mini potatoes but taste like coconut heaven.

If you live in the Philadelphia area, these candies start making an appearance at bakeries, candy shops and grocery stores around early March. Their origin is uncertain but some claim they were first made by Irish immigrant candy makers in the late 1800s or the early 1900s.

Irish Potato Candy - PennsylvaniaThis no-cook recipe that we found from The Kitchn couldn’t be easier. To help shape the candies, put the portioned candy batter in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes or until the batter firms up. Then simply shape and dip in cinnamon. Slainte!

 The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site in Philadelphia (only open for tours on the weekends) showcases the author and poet who is often called the Master of the Macabre.

Irish Potato Candy

  • Servings: 4 dozen
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons butter, softened to room temperature
  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened to room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 4 cups powdered sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 2/3 cups sweetened coconut
  • 2 tablespoons cinnamon

Instructions

Using a stand or handheld mixer, combine butter, cream cheese and vanilla. Beat for 3 minutes until mixture is smooth, occasionally stopping to scrape down sides of bowl. Gradually add the powdered sugar, again, stopping to scrape down sides of bowl. Add salt and coconut, mixing until incorporated.

On a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, scoop out batter into tablespoon-sized mounds. Place baking sheet in refrigerator for approximately 30 minutes or until candy is cold. Remove baking sheet.

Place cinnamon in a clean, small bowl. Shape each mound into a little potato. Toss each piece of candy in the cinnamon until completely coated.

Hazelnut Gremolata – Oregon

Let us introduce you to the best condiment you never heard of ― gremolata. Traditionally, gremolata is a mixture of chopped parsley, lemon zest, garlic and sometimes anchovies.

Hazelnut Gremolata

Usually tossed over poultry, fish or beef, this tasty garnish can also elevate your veggie game. And if you throw in a few hazelnuts, the state nut of Oregon, you raise the roof even higher. We tried it with both green beans and roasted cauliflower and could not have been happier. The gremolata adds texture, brightness and a little crunch. Consider shaving some parmesan on top if you really want to guild the lily.

The John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in central Oregon spans 44 million years and contains a wealth of well-preserved fossils.

Hazelnut Gremolata

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flat or curly parsley
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 20 toasted hazelnuts
  • Zest from one lemon
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (flavored olive oil works well here)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste

Instructions

In the bowl of a food processor, add parsley, garlic, hazelnuts and lemon zest. Pulse until just combined, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl to incorporate all ingredients. Add olive oil and lemon juice. Pulse until finely minced. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Grilled Pimento Cheese Sandwiches – South Carolina

If you are in need of comfort, nothing is more soothing than a bowl of tomato soup and grilled cheese. We recently saw grilled pimento

Grilled Pimento Cheese- South Carolina

cheese as a menu item at a fancy sandwich shop and thought it was genius.

We’ve talked before about how pimento cheese spread did not become a home prepared item until after WWII. This delicious cheese dip can be made as zippy as you want with the addition of hot sauce. Spread between slices of sturdy bread and grilled until the cheese is oozing and melted, this is the definition of a culinary hug.

Congaree National Park, near Hopkins, encompasses almost 27,000 acres and is a designated Wilderness Area, an International Biosphere Reserve, a Globally Important Bird Area and a National Natural Landmark. The largest intact expanse of old growth bottomland hardwood forest remaining in the southeastern United States is its claim to fame.

Grilled Pimento Cheese Sandwiches

  • Servings: 3
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup grated Monterey Jack cheese
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 ounces pimentos, drained
  • 1/4 teaspoon Worchester sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Dash of hot sauce (optional)
  • 6 slices sturdy seeded Italian bread

Instructions

In the bowl of a food processor, add first six ingredients. Pulse until combined. Season with salt and pepper and hot sauce, if desired.

Divide mixture evenly on 3 slices of Italian bread. Place top on each sandwich. Butter each side of bread. Grill sandwiches in a hot pan on each side until golden brown and cheese is melted.

Sopapillas – Texas

Texas is fortunate to have not one, but two official state pastries, strudel and sopapillas. While you may indulge in sopapillas at your favorite Mexican joint, they are surprisingly easy to make at home.

Sopapillas - TexasThe dough comes together easily and you don’t even need an electric mixer. We opted for a cinnamon sugar dusting for our sopapillas, but you can leave yours unadorned or top them with honey or chocolate sauce.

On the very western edge of Texas sits Big Bend National Park. A spectacular spot for bird watching, visitors can also hike, bike, fish, take river trips or stargaze.

Sopapillas

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons shortening
  • 3/4 cup warm water
  • Canola oil (for frying)
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Add shortening and water. Knead dough with your hands until combined, making sure not to overmix dough. Wrap dough in plastic wrap and place in refrigerator for 1 hour or until well chilled.

Remove dough and place on clean work surface. Divide in half. Roll out one dough half into a circle, about 1/4 inch thick. With a pizza cutter, cut circle into 8 equal pieces. Repeat with remaining dough half.

Heat canola oil in a large, heavy pot until 375 degrees. While oil is heating, combine sugar and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Working in batches, fry sopapillas, about 2 minutes on each side or until light brown. Remove with spider or slotted spoon. Place in sugar/cinnamon mixture and toss on both sides until sopapilla is well coated. Let cool slightly before serving.

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo – Louisiana

Louisiana declared gumbo as its state cuisine in 2004. Some scholars think gumbo might have been around as early as the 18th century. The word “gumbo” comes from the West African word for okra, “ki ngombo,” as okra was often used in this dish as a thickening agent.

This rich stew starts with a roux (flour and oil/butter), followed by  what Louisianans lovingly refer to as the “trinity” (onions, peppers

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo - Louisiana and celery). From there, variations abound: some are heavy on the seafood, some favor chicken or pork, and there is even a vegetable version for Lent.

We’ve brought you an adaptation of Emeril Lagasse’s gumbo recipe. We have made it too many times to count. Don’t be intimidated by the amount of time it takes to make, most of it is hands-off and it makes a TON. You can thank us later for the leftovers. You can find filé powder in the international aisle at most large grocery stores or online.

This weekend down in NOLA, parades from the so-called “super krewes” of Orpheus, Bacchus and Endymion will take place, featuring the biggest and most elaborate floats. Check out www.mardigrasneworleans.com for a full schedule.

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 4 lb. chicken thighs, skin removed
  • 1 tablespoon Creole seasoning
  • 1-2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 2 cups onion, chopped
  • 2 ribs of celery, chopped
  • 1 medium green pepper, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 lb. kielbasa sausage
  • 8 cups chicken broth
  • 1 tablespoon filé powder
  • 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • white rice (for serving)
  • hot sauce (for serving, optional)

Instructions

In a large pot, heat 1-2 tablespoons oil over medium heat. Rub chicken thighs with Creole seasoning. Working in batches, saute chicken in oil until it browns, about 5-6 minutes. With tongs, remove chicken to a plate and set aside. Add a ½ cup oil and flour to pot. Scrape up any browned bits on bottom of the pan. Cook roux until dark brown (the color of a tarnished penny), approximately 20 minutes. Add the vegetables and cook them for about 5 minutes. Add the salt, cayenne pepper, and bay leaves. Add the sausage and then the chicken broth. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook uncovered for about 1 hour. Add reserved chicken to the pot and cook for 1 to 1 ½ hours until chicken is tender and falling off the bone, occasionally skimming off the excess fat from the top of the gumbo.

Again with tongs, remove chicken from the stew to a clean plate. When cool enough to handle, remove meat from bones. Return meat to the gumbo, discarding the bones and fat. Stir in the filé powder, parsley and green onion. Adjust seasonings to taste. Best served over a scoop of white rice.

Recipe by Emeril Lagasse

 

Baked Potato Chips with Beer Cheese Dip – Idaho

The Gem State loooves their potatoes and who can blame them? Potatoes are like a warm, comforting hug. They are an excellent source of Vitamin C and a good source of potassium (even more

Baked Potato Chips with Beer Cheese Dip - Idaho than a banana), and the cost – cheap. Idaho’s most famous product is also versatile. Potatoes can be baked, mashed or fried, or made into soup, bread, cake, or candy.

If you are looking for something to serve for the Big Game next week, consider homemade Baked Potato Chips. Because they only use a little bit of canola oil, they are healthier than fried chips. The Beer Cheese Dip that we made to go along with the chips comes together very quickly and is tres delicious. Just play around with the amount of the seasonings until it tastes good.

For a fun and quirky experience, visit the Museum of Clean in Pocatello. See nearly 1,000 vacuums dating back to the mid-nineteenth century, as well as a Texas sized trash can, washing machines, brooms and tubs. Dedicated to “clean homes, clean minds, clean language, clean community, and a clean world.”

Baked Potato Chips with Beer Cheese Dip

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

For the chips:

  • 1 lb. small, gold potatoes
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon cumin

For the dip:

  • 8 oz. cream cheese, softened
  • 3/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese, divided
  • 1/4 cup beer
  • Onion powder to taste
  • Garlic powder to taste
  • Paprika to taste
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon hot sauce (optional)
  • 2 green onions, diced, divided

Instructions

To make chips: Cut potatoes 1/4 inch thick. Take sliced potatoes and plunge them into a bowl filled with ice water. Let soak for 30 minutes. Drain and pat dry. In medium bowl, combine oil and seasonings. Add potatoes, tossing until well coated. Lay potatoes in a single layer on two baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Bake for 10 minutes at 425 degrees, then flip and bake another 10 minutes (watching carefully so the chips do not burn), or until potatoes are crisp and golden.

To make dip: In a medium bowl, combine softened cream cheese, half of the shredded cheddar, beer, spices, Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce and half the green onions until well mixed. Transfer to serving bowl. Top mixture with the remaining cheddar, then remaining green onions.