Category Archives: Beef

UP Pasties – Michigan

The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is known for its pasties (pronounced pass-tee) which are meat pies, usually filled with potatoes, onions and carrots and sometimes rutabaga. The pasty

UP Pasties - Michigan

was brought to the UP by the Cornish who settled there to be copper miners. Much like it’s cousin, the pepperoni roll of West Virginia, the pasty was a quick, easy and filling meal that miners could pack for lunch. Bonus: it didn’t have to be heated to be delicious.

We loved this recipe, slighted adapted from one sent to us by reader Russell Primm. UP PastiesThe dough came together easily and the filling was delicious. Thanks Russ!

Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore in Munising hugs the shore of Lake Superior. With its dramatic sandstone cliffs and iconic sandstone feature called Miners Castle, this beautiful area offers all kinds of outdoor pursuits including hiking, fishing, swimming, and kayaking.

UP Pasties

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For dough:

  • 4 cups flour, sifted
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 cup shortening
  • 1/2 cup ice water

For filling:

  • 1 1/2 cups potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 1/2 cups onions, diced
  • 1 cup grated rutabaga
  • 1 cup carrots, peeled and diced
  • 2 cups ground beef
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Instructions

For dough:

In a medium bowl, add flour, salt, and baking powder. Add the shortening and blend with a pastry blender. Add the ice water, a bit at a time until the dough comes together. Divide dough into 6 equal disks. Place between sheets of waxed paper. Chill in refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.

For filling and finishing pasties:

In the meantime, combine potatoes, onion, rutabaga and carrots in a very large bowl. Add ground beef. Stir until well combined.

Roll out each pasty dough into a 7- or 8-inch circle. Add a heaping cup of filling. Sprinkle filling with salt and pepper and a teaspoon of butter. Fold the dough over, forming a half moon. Roll the edges closed, slightly crimping with fingers, making sure the dough is sealed. Repeat with remaining dough disks. Place pasties on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cut two small slits in each pasty to vent steam. Bake at 425 degrees for 20-30 minutes, then reduce heat to 350 degrees. Bake 20-30 more or until pasties are golden brown.

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New York System Hot Wieners – Rhode Island

Calling all hot dog aficionados. Yes, we acknowledge that the name of this dish is confusing. Why are Rhode Island hot dogs called “New York System Hot Wieners”? As best we can determine, New York

NY System Wieners - Rhode Island

System is a nod to New York’s Coney Island and might have been used as a marketing strategy at the turn of the century. These dogs, usually a mixture of veal and pork with a super snappy casing, are doused with yellow mustard, then a chili beef mixture, raw chopped onions, and finally a dusting of celery salt. Of course, every Rhode Island hot dog joint and every Rhode Island family has their favorite recipe so a quick Google search will yield many variations. We tinkered with the spices a bit and came up with this recipe which we think you will love, not too sweet but definitely sassy. It’ll elevate your dogs from humdrum to wicked good. These would be a welcome addition to any Memorial Day celebration no matter what part of the country you happen to be.

The Cliff Walk in Newport was designated a National Recreation Trail way back in 1975. This three and a half mile walk hugs the eastern shore of Newport with stunning ocean vistas on one side and the backyards of Gilded Age mansions on the other.

New York System Hot Wieners

  • Servings: 12-16
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup onions, diced
  • 2 tablespoons margarine or butter
  • 1 lb. 80/20 ground beef
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon celery salt
  • ½ teaspoon allspice
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ cup water
  • 16 hot dogs, cooked
  • 16 hot dog buns
  • Yellow mustard
  • Chopped onion (for garnish)
  • Celery salt (for garnish)

Instructions

In a large sauté pan over medium heat, add butter. Once melted, add onion, cook until translucent. Add ground beef and cook until no longer pink, approximately 15 minutes. Break up large chunks of meat with potato masher. Add Worcestershire sauce, spices and ¼ cup water. Stir until spices are completely incorporated.

To prepare wieners, microwave buns for 15 seconds. Add hot dog, mustard, approximately two tablespoons of beef mixture and chopped onion. Top with celery salt.

Would You Like Fries with That: Pittsburgh Salad

A Pittsburgh salad is a unique, regional dish that few outsiders know about. Well, we here in the StateEats Kitchen are about to break open the lid on one of the best taste sensations east of the Monongahela River. The recipe, purportedly created in the 1960s at a drive-in called Jerry’s Curb Service, can vary a bit.

Pittsburgh Salad

The greens are usually romaine. Toss on a few veggies, usually English cucumber, red onion and tomatoes, but add whatever you like. Thinly sliced steak is the most common protein, (use your favorite) but you can sub in chicken if you’d prefer. Add some shaved Parmesan cheese, or crumbled blue if you want to get crazy. However, the two “musts” for this dish include crunchy croutons and French fries. Yes, you read that right. Croutons and FRIES. We might have died and gone to heaven. Anytime you can turn something virtuous into something a little bit naughty is a win in our book. Top with ranch dressing and have it at. You’re welcome.

Check out the Andy Warhol Museum right near the confluence of the Monongahela, Allegheny and Ohio Rivers. Pittsburgh’s native son is honored with seven floors of prints, sculpture, paintings, film and video, and other documents of the artist’s life.

Pittsburgh Salad

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 3-4 steaks, grilled and then thinly sliced
  • 6 cups chopped romaine salad
  • 1 English cucumber, thinly sliced
  • ½ red onion, sliced thinly
  • Baby tomatoes, halved
  • Parmesan cheese, shaved or cheese of your choice
  • Croutons
  • French fries
  • Ranch dressing

Instructions

Top romaine salad with cuke, red onion, and baby tomatoes or vegetables of your choice. Add sliced steak, the croutons and fries. Top with dressing.

Frito Pie – Texas

Frito Pie is a beloved Texas dish, probably made popular at little league and football concession stands across the Lone Star State. The recipe is simple. Take your favorite chili, slice open a bag of

Frito Pie - Texas

Fritos, ladle said chili on top of the corn chips and garnish with cheese. Think nachos served in a bag but eaten with a plastic fork. Messy but oh-so-yummy.

The origins of Frito Pie are contested but Frito-Lay asserts San Antonio resident Daisy Doolin, mother of Charles Elmer Doolin (inventor of the Frito), came up with the idea in the 1930s to help market the chips. Fun fact: in October of 2102, Frito-Lay set a Guinness World Record for the largest Frito Pie at the State Fair of Texas, weighing in at a monstrous 1,325 pounds. Holy moly, chili willy!

You can make your own chili or pop over your favorite grocery store and pick up some ready-made chili at the soup station. Texas chili traditionally does not have beans but we looooooove us some beans so we added them. Be conscious of the amount of salt you add to the chili when making it since the chips are quite salty on their own.

One of the newest national monuments is Waco Mammoth, so designated by President Obama in 2015. Between 65,000 and 72,000 years ago, a herd of 19 mammoths drowned in rapidly rising river waters and were trapped. You can now see the remains in situ along with a bull mammoth and a camel.

Frito Pie

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 1 pound lean ground beef or turkey
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 green or red pepper, diced
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, diced
  • 1 14 oz. can diced tomatoes
  • 1-2 12 oz. bottle of beer
  • 3 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • Salt (go easy on this)
  • Pepper
  • Cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 2 14 oz. cans dark red kidney beans, drained (optional)
  • 1 14 oz. can white beans, drained (optional)
  • Snack sized Fritos corn chips, one bag per person
  • Cheddar cheese

 Instructions

In a large pot over medium heat, brown beef until no longer pink. Add onions, peppers and garlic and cook until onion is translucent. Add diced tomatoes and beer, then chili powder and cumin. Let simmer for 30 minutes. Add beans if using. If chili is too thick, add additional beer. Adjust seasonings with salt, pepper and cayenne if heat is needed. Cook another 15-20 minutes or until beans are heated through.

To serve, cut Fritos bag on the long side. Add a healthy scoop of chili and top with cheese.

Over the Moonie: Goudarooni – Nebraska

The goudarooni is a variation on the calzone, a folded over pizza with the filing inside. We couldn’t determine where the wacky name comes from since there is no gouda in the recipe, but this regional

Goudarooni- Nebraska

dish you’ve never heard of comes to you by way of Omaha, Nebraska, specifically Orsi’s Italian Bakery on Pacific Street. This joint has been around since 1919 so you can bet they know their stuff. Our recipe is a slight adaption of Saveur’s and is filled with potatoes, tomato-y ground beef and two types of cheese. Make this and you will not go hungry for days.

Goudarooni - Nebraska

Do not miss Omaha’s Durham Museum. Located in the former Union Station, the Durham is a hands-on history museum with restored trains from different eras, western artifacts, and even an old time soda fountain.

Goudarooni

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

 For crust:

  • 1 package yeast
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 ½ cups warm water
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 1/2 – 4 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Cooking spray

For filing:

  • 1 ½ pounds Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and sliced with mandolin
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 pound ground beef or turkey
  • 1 6-ounce can of tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried chili flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 cups grated mozzarella
  • 1 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese

Instructions

To make crust: To make crust: In a large bowl, dissolve yeast and 1 teaspoon sugar in ½ cup warm water. Let sit until mixture begins to foam. Add rest of water and olive oil. Add 3 ½ cups flour, salt, and remaining sugar. Mix with a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook until well combined. If dough is too sticky add a quarter cup of flour at a time, until dough is smooth and elastic and pulls away from the bowl. Transfer dough to a large bowl that has been coated with cooking spray. Cover with a tea towel and let rise until doubled, about 90 minutes.

To make filing: Place potatoes with a ¼ cup olive oil, salt and pepper on a baking sheet. Mix with hands until potatoes are well coated. Spread evenly and bake at 500 degrees for 6-8 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Remove and set aside.

In a large sauté pan, cook onions in remaining ¼ cup olive oil until translucent. Add meat, breaking it up while it cooks until it is no longer pink. Add tomato paste, spices and sugar, along with ½ cup water. Cook until sauce thickens, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

To assemble goudarooni: Punch the dough down. On a floured surface, roll out the dough into an 18” X 20” rectangle. Slide a well-floured pizza peel under half the dough. Spread half the mozzarella and pecorino, leaving a 1-inch border. Spread the potatoes, then the meat sauce. Top with the remaining cheese. Fold up dough over the filling, and crimp the edges closed. Cut two slits in the top for steam to escape. Slide into 500 degree oven. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown.

Five-Way Any Day: Cincinnati Chili – Ohio

If you are a Buckeye, then you know Skyline Chili, the ubiquitous Cincinnati chain that began in 1949. Legend has it that the business got its name from the city view of the chili parlor’s original Glenway Avenue location. What makes Cincy chili unique is its distinctive

Cincinnati Chili

spices including cinnamon, allspice and cocoa powder, reminiscent of the Greek dish moussaka, not surprising given that the chain was founded by Nicholas Lambrinides, a Greek immigrant. Just as unique is that the chili is almost always served on a bed of spaghetti and fans know just how to order: either 3-way (chili with spaghetti and cheese); 4-way (chili with spaghetti and cheese and either onions or beans) or 5-way (chili with spaghetti, cheese, onions and beans). We’re a fan of the 5-way ourselves, but the beauty of Cincy Chili is that is entirely customizable. Put out bowls of cheese, onion and beans and let everyone help themselves.

If Queen City is your destination, don’t miss Findlay Market. On the National Register of Historic Places, the state’s oldest continuously operated market offers meat, fish, poultry, produce, cheese, and lots of dining options. In the summer months the market hosts a biergarten with live entertainment.

Cincinnati Chili

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: easy
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Recipe courtesy of Jessica Hudacek Ried

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 3 cups onion, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 3 pounds lamb, ground beef or ground turkey
  • 2 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon allspice
  • 1 ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 4 2/3 cup beef broth
  • 1/3 cup tomato paste
  • 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 ½ tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • 2 15 oz. cans kidney beans, drained
  • Spaghetti
  • Chopped onion
  • Cheddar cheese

Instructions

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add onions and sauté until soft. Add meat, cooking until no longer pink. Add cocoa, allspice, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, and cumin. Stir in broth and then tomato paste, vinegar, chili powder, brown sugar, and Worcestershire sauce. Bring to boil, then reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer uncovered until thickened, about 1 hour. Season with salt and pepper. Heat beans separately, tossed with 2 tablespoons oil and seasoned with salt and pepper.

To serve, ladle chili over spaghetti. Top with beans, cheese, and onions or any combination thereof.

Pastrami Burgers with Fry Sauce – Utah

We’ve talked about regional burgers before when we explored the Minnesota Juicy Lucy and the Okie Onion Burger. Now comes the

Pastrami Burger - Utah

Utah Pastrami Burger. Made famous by Utah’s Crown Burgers, the Pastrami Burger has been around since the 1950s in California. Manuel Katsanevas, founder of the Crown Burger on North Temple Street, admits that he learned to make pastrami burgers from a guy in Los Angeles. This ode to beef is topped with sliced lettuce, tomato, onions, cheese and of course, hot pastrami.

And you cannot forget the fry sauce. Fry sauce is a little like a smooth Thousand Island dressing, seasoned with pickle juice rather than relish. Great on the burger, the fry sauce also is a tasty dip for French fries.

Prepared to be dazzled by speed, snow and aerial tricks at various events at Utah Olympic Park in the next few weeks including the Luge World Cup, the Nordic Combined Continental Cup, the US Freestyle Aerials Selection, and the Bobsled and Skeleton World Cup.

Pastrami Burger

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

For the burgers:

  • 1 1/2 lb ground chuck
  • 1 ¼ teaspoons kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • ½ pound thinly slice beef pastrami
  • Sliced American or Cheddar cheese
  • 4 burger buns
  • Sliced tomato, lettuce, onions (optional)

For the fry sauce:

  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • ¼ cup ketchup
  • 2-3 teaspoons pickle juice (to taste)
  • 2-3 dashes hot sauce

Instructions

For the fry sauce: Combine all ingredients in small bowl. Set aside.

For the burgers: Mix ground beef with salt, pepper garlic powder and Worcestershire sauce. Divide into 4 patties. Grill 3 to 4 minutes each side for a medium burger. Place on buns. Top with cheese, then pastrami warmed for a few minutes in a frying pan. Add fry sauce and other desired fixings.

Gimme Chimi: Beef Chimichangas – Arizona

The origins of the chimichanga are murky at best. Two restaurants in the Grand Canyon State stake a claim: Macayo’s Mexican Kitchen, a

Beef Chimichangas - AZ

Phoenix chain, asserts that the dish was created there in 1946. Tucson’s El Charro Café also says that the dish was the happy accident of a burrito being knocked into the deep fat fryer in the early 1950s. The cook started to swear in Spanish, but seeing children, quickly changed her profane utterance to the word “chimichanga” which loosely translates as “thingamajig.”

In 2011, Macayo’s started a petition drive to have the chimichanga recognized by the Arizona legislature as the official state dish. Alas, that effort was not successful, so poor Arizona must muddle along without a signature dish to call its own. That’s OK, because StateEats is officially declaring our allegiance to chimis and all its variations, from pork to chicken to vegetarian. For this recipe, we went with the very traditional beef. We also tested both the deep frying and baking methods. Although purists may scoff, we actually preferred the baked version which is less heavy. Save your calories for a margarita (prickly pear!) and chips and guac.

You still have time to check out the Arizona State Fair which runs Wednesday through Sunday until November 6, 2015, in Phoenix.

Beef Chimichangas

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • Small white onion, chopped
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced (optional)
  • 4 oz. can chopped green chilies
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 6 flour tortillas
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 cup Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
  • Salsa (optional)
  • Guacamole (optional)
  • Sour cream (optional)
  • Cilantro, chopped (optional)

Instructions

In a large skillet over medium heat, brown the beef until it is no longer pink. Drain the fat. Add onions, garlic and jalapeno (if using). Cook until onion is translucent and pepper is soft. Add green chilies, chili powder, and cumin. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Soften tortillas one at a time by heating them in the microwave for 10 to 15 seconds. Add approximately one third of a cup of filling just off center of the tortilla. Fold up bottom edge closest to you, then sides, then roll up tortilla the rest of the way. Secure with a toothpick. Repeat with remaining tortillas. Place into a shallow pan, seam side down. Brush with melted butter. Bake at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until tortillas just begin to brown. Remove from oven, top with shredded cheese and return to oven for 5 minutes or until cheese is melted. Serve with salsa, guacamole and/or sour cream and top with chopped cilantro if desired.

 

 

 

 

Lovey Dovey Loosey Goosey: Loose Meat Sandwich – Iowa

A loose meat sandwich is a declaration in simplicity. Not gussied up with tons of toppings, not loaded with cheese, the loose meat sandwich is not a sloppy joe or a burger, but something in between.

Loose Meat Sandwich - Iowa

Sometimes called a tavern sandwich, the beef is lightly seasoned and usually adorned with ketchup, mustard, raw onion, and pickle rounds. Made famous by the Midwest chain Maid-Rite, this ode to beef has been sustaining Iowans, where most of the stores are located, since the 1920s.

If don’t live in the Midwest, you can easily make this sandwich at home. You’ll find tons of variations on this recipe, with lots of different ingredients — some even include cola as a sweetener — but we liked this one for its straightforwardness with ingredients you probably already have on hand.

If you’ve never checked out the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines, you’ve been missing out. From its iconic gold dome, to the glass floor in the rotunda, the building is simply stunning and well worth a tour.

Loose Meat Sandwiches

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients
• 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
• 1 large onion, chopped finely (reserve approx. 2 tablespoons raw)
• 1 pound ground beef (or turkey)
• 1 tablespoon yellow mustard
• 1 tablespoon white vinegar
• 1 ½ tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
• 1 14.5 oz. can of beef broth
• 2 teaspoons brown sugar
• 4 sesame seed hamburger buns
• Salt
• Pepper
• Dill pickles, sliced

Instructions
Heat the vegetable oil on medium heat in a large saute pan. Add onions, sauting until translucent. Add beef and cook until meat is no longer pink. Use a potato masher to break up the larger chunks of beef. Add the mustard, vinegar and Worcestershire sauce, then add the beef broth and sugar. Continue cooking until broth is reduced. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve on buns, topped with ketchup and/or mustard, raw onions and pickle slices.

Big and Beefy: Texas Brisket

Although the state snack of Texas is chips and salsa, and the state dish is chili con carne, we decided we needed to highlight beef in a big Texas way. The Lone Star state is the top cattle producer in the country ― a $10.5 billion industry in 2012 — according to the Texas Department of Agriculture.

Texas Brisket

Barbeque can mean different things depending on where you eat in this country. In the southeast, barbeque usually means pig. But in Texas, when folks babble on about barbeque, they usually are talking about beef, and by beef, we mean brisket.

The key to a good brisket is picking a good cut of meat with a bit of marbling (choose choice or prime) and cooking it low and slow over a wood or charcoal fire. Is this method time consuming? Yes. It is worth every minute? Absolutely! We smoked ours over hickory chips and the resulting meat had a beautiful bark (that dark, crusty exterior) and a wonderful, smoky flavor. Some Texans scoff at using any type of BBQ sauce but we provided one for you here, just in case you like to embellish your meat.

If you’d like some homegrown Texas refreshment to wash down that BBQ, head to the Dr. Pepper Museum in Waco. Fun and kitschy!

Texas Brisket

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 3-4 lb. choice or prime beef brisket, trimmed
  • 4 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 4 tablespoons black pepper

For beef rub:

  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons dry mustard
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar

For BBQ sauce:

  • 1 cup chopped onions
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/3 cups beer
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon brown mustard
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Instructions

For meat: The night before, mix the 4 tablespoons salt and pepper together in a small bowl. Rub on the brisket. Loosely cover with foil and let sit overnight in fridge. Mix all ingredients for the rub in another bowl, set aside.

In the morning, preheat smoker. Remove meat from fridge and cover meat with a thin coating of vegetable oil. Cover with the rub. When the smoker reaches 225 degrees, place meat in smoker. Cooking time will depend on thickness of brisket, but a general rule is about 90 minutes for each pound. When brisket reaches 190-200 degrees, remove from smoker, wrap tightly in aluminum foil and place in a cooler lined with old towels. This will allow the brisket to stay hot until serving time.

For BBQ sauce: Heat vegetable oil in a medium saucepan. When hot, add chopped onion and garlic. Sauté until onion is translucent. Add beer, ketchup, brown sugar, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce and mustard. Stir until combined. Add chili powder and crushed red pepper. Bring to a boil. Let simmer for one hour until thickened. Allow to cool slightly. Place BBQ sauce in a food processor or blender. Blend until onions and garlic are incorporated into the sauce (if too thick, thin with a little bit of the leftover beer).

When ready to serve brisket, reheat BBQ sauce. Slice meat perpendicular to the grain and drizzle or dollop with sauce. Serve plain or on soft buns.