Category Archives: Beef

Big and Beefy: Texas Brisket

Although the state snack of Texas is chips and salsa, and the state dish is chili con carne, we decided we needed to highlight beef in a big Texas way. The Lone Star state is the top cattle producer in the country ― a $10.5 billion industry in 2012 — according to the Texas Department of Agriculture.

Texas Brisket

Barbeque can mean different things depending on where you eat in this country. In the southeast, barbeque usually means pig. But in Texas, when folks babble on about barbeque, they usually are talking about beef, and by beef, we mean brisket.

The key to a good brisket is picking a good cut of meat with a bit of marbling (choose choice or prime) and cooking it low and slow over a wood or charcoal fire. Is this method time consuming? Yes. It is worth every minute? Absolutely! We smoked ours over hickory chips and the resulting meat had a beautiful bark (that dark, crusty exterior) and a wonderful, smoky flavor. Some Texans scoff at using any type of BBQ sauce but we provided one for you here, just in case you like to embellish your meat.

If you’d like some homegrown Texas refreshment to wash down that BBQ, head to the Dr. Pepper Museum in Waco. Fun and kitschy!

Texas Brisket

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 3-4 lb. choice or prime beef brisket, trimmed
  • 4 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 4 tablespoons black pepper

For beef rub:

  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons dry mustard
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar

For BBQ sauce:

  • 1 cup chopped onions
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/3 cups beer
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon brown mustard
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Instructions

For meat: The night before, mix the 4 tablespoons salt and pepper together in a small bowl. Rub on the brisket. Loosely cover with foil and let sit overnight in fridge. Mix all ingredients for the rub in another bowl, set aside.

In the morning, preheat smoker. Remove meat from fridge and cover meat with a thin coating of vegetable oil. Cover with the rub. When the smoker reaches 225 degrees, place meat in smoker. Cooking time will depend on thickness of brisket, but a general rule is about 90 minutes for each pound. When brisket reaches 190-200 degrees, remove from smoker, wrap tightly in aluminum foil and place in a cooler lined with old towels. This will allow the brisket to stay hot until serving time.

For BBQ sauce: Heat vegetable oil in a medium saucepan. When hot, add chopped onion and garlic. Sauté until onion is translucent. Add beer, ketchup, brown sugar, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce and mustard. Stir until combined. Add chili powder and crushed red pepper. Bring to a boil. Let simmer for one hour until thickened. Allow to cool slightly. Place BBQ sauce in a food processor or blender. Blend until onions and garlic are incorporated into the sauce (if too thick, thin with a little bit of the leftover beer).

When ready to serve brisket, reheat BBQ sauce. Slice meat perpendicular to the grain and drizzle or dollop with sauce. Serve plain or on soft buns.

 

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Okie Onion Burger – Oklahoma

The onion burger may be one of the best regional burgers you’ve never heard of. Until now. Legend has it that the onion burger was created in the 1920s by a man named Ross Davis at the Hamburger

Okie Onion Burger - Oklahoma

Inn in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Presumably, the onions were a way to stretch the meat in a tough economy. The onions get mashed into the beef and get nice and caramelized so that each bite is beef-n-onion heaven.

Okie Onion Burger - Oklahoma

The trick with this recipe is to slice the onions super thin, preferably on a mandolin if you have one. And the quantity of onions is not a typo, use about half an onion for each burger and feel the allium love.

Check out Downtown in December in Oklahoma City for ice skating, snow tubing, holiday lights, pop up shops and other winter fun.

Okie Onion Burgers

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • 2 medium onions, sliced very thin
  • Vegetable oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 4-6 burger buns
  • Cheese (optional)
  • Sliced tomato and lettuce (optional)

Instructions

Divide beef into 4 or 6 balls. Heat a cast iron skillet until a bead of water sizzles on the surface. Add a small amount of oil. Add beef and press down until thin. Add about half an onion to each burger, pressing down until the onion is incorporated into the beef. Season with salt and pepper. Flip burger. Add cheese. Cook until onions are caramelized and beef is done, adding a bit oil if necessary. Place on a bun and add burger accompaniments of your choice.

 

Juicy Lucy – Minnesota

The origins of the first Juicy Lucy — a cheese-stuffed burger — are a bit murky. Our theory is that a Jonas, Sven or Nils from days of yore craved a tasty morsel to ward off the ten or so months of winter in the Land of 10,000 Lakes. Sounds good, right?

Juicy Lucy

Two venerable Minneapolis institutions each claim to have invented the carnivorous concoction and each claim to make the best Juicy Lucy. Twin Cities dwellers fall into two camps: pro Matt’s and pro 5-8 Club and the rivalry is similar to the cheesesteak battle between Geno’s and Pat’s on the south side of Philly. Matt’s claims Continue reading Juicy Lucy – Minnesota

Cheese, Please! Philly Cheesesteaks – Pennsylvania

Philadelphia is known as the City of Brotherly Love, and serious lunch-love is what we feel when we partake of Pennsylvania’s official state sandwich, the Philly Cheesesteak. This pinnacle of cheesiness has actually been around since 1930 when Pat Olivieri Philly Cheesesteakcreated the sandwich at his hot dog stand in South Philly. If you’re from the Philadelphia area, you know that folks claim their allegiance to a particular cheesesteak joint with a feverish fervor. But you can easily make this delectable creation at home. The trick is slicing the beef super thin, which you can do if you freeze the meat ahead of time.

Continue reading Cheese, Please! Philly Cheesesteaks – Pennsylvania