Category Archives: Bread

Over the Moonie: Goudarooni – Nebraska

The goudarooni is a variation on the calzone, a folded over pizza with the filing inside. We couldn’t determine where the wacky name comes from since there is no gouda in the recipe, but this regional

Goudarooni- Nebraska

dish you’ve never heard of comes to you by way of Omaha, Nebraska, specifically Orsi’s Italian Bakery on Pacific Street. This joint has been around since 1919 so you can bet they know their stuff. Our recipe is a slight adaption of Saveur’s and is filled with potatoes, tomato-y ground beef and two types of cheese. Make this and you will not go hungry for days.

Goudarooni - Nebraska

Do not miss Omaha’s Durham Museum. Located in the former Union Station, the Durham is a hands-on history museum with restored trains from different eras, western artifacts, and even an old time soda fountain.

Goudarooni

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

 For crust:

  • 1 package yeast
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 ½ cups warm water
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 1/2 – 4 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Cooking spray

For filing:

  • 1 ½ pounds Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and sliced with mandolin
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 pound ground beef or turkey
  • 1 6-ounce can of tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried chili flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 cups grated mozzarella
  • 1 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese

Instructions

To make crust: To make crust: In a large bowl, dissolve yeast and 1 teaspoon sugar in ½ cup warm water. Let sit until mixture begins to foam. Add rest of water and olive oil. Add 3 ½ cups flour, salt, and remaining sugar. Mix with a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook until well combined. If dough is too sticky add a quarter cup of flour at a time, until dough is smooth and elastic and pulls away from the bowl. Transfer dough to a large bowl that has been coated with cooking spray. Cover with a tea towel and let rise until doubled, about 90 minutes.

To make filing: Place potatoes with a ¼ cup olive oil, salt and pepper on a baking sheet. Mix with hands until potatoes are well coated. Spread evenly and bake at 500 degrees for 6-8 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Remove and set aside.

In a large sauté pan, cook onions in remaining ¼ cup olive oil until translucent. Add meat, breaking it up while it cooks until it is no longer pink. Add tomato paste, spices and sugar, along with ½ cup water. Cook until sauce thickens, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

To assemble goudarooni: Punch the dough down. On a floured surface, roll out the dough into an 18” X 20” rectangle. Slide a well-floured pizza peel under half the dough. Spread half the mozzarella and pecorino, leaving a 1-inch border. Spread the potatoes, then the meat sauce. Top with the remaining cheese. Fold up dough over the filling, and crimp the edges closed. Cut two slits in the top for steam to escape. Slide into 500 degree oven. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown.

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Getouttaheye: Bagels – New York

Schmeared with cream cheese, toasted with a bit of butter, covered with lox, made into a breakfast sandwich with egg and cheese … who doesn’t love a bagel? Smooth and glossy on the outside, chewy

NYC Bagel

and  delectable on the inside, bagels are one food that has made the jump from ethnic to ubiquitous in the span of about 100 years.

Folklore has it that the bagel was created after Polish King John III Sobieski saved Austria from invading Ottoman Turks in the Battle of Vienna in 1683. A baker made a roll in the shape of a stirrup (called a beugel) to commemorate the victory. Others maintain that the bagel was given to women in Krakow during this same period as a gift after having a baby.

What is clear is that Eastern European Jews brought the bagel to New York at the turn of the century. In 1907, bagel bakers unionized, forming the International Beigel Bakers’ Union, thereby monopolizing and controlling their handmade product. In the 1950s, Murray Lender figured out that he could mass produce bagels, freeze them and deliver them to grocery stores. And with that bold move, bagels became mainstream.

We personally have made it our mission to try bagels all over the country but in our opinion, it’s pretty hard to beat a New York bagel (some attribute it to the fantastic NYC water). If you live in a part of the country where bagels are not so great, try this recipe. You won’t be disappointed.

A couple of pointers: Just use your finger to make the hole in the

NYC bagels - how to shape

bagel. Twirl the dough around your index finger. It’s fun!

Also, bagels get their unique texture from both boiling and baking. The bath the bagels take is not long. For a chewier version that is

 

DSC_1538 label

more like NYC bagels, boil for 2 minutes in each side. If you want a softer bagel, reduce to one minute on each side.

For a unique look at the working class immigrant in the early half of the 20th century, visit the fantastic Tenement Museum on the Lower East Side in Manhattan. The museum has many tours and offerings, you can visit multiple times and not see the same thing.

NYC Bagels

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons of active dry yeast
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons of granulated sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups warm water (plus or minus ¼ cup more)
  • 3 1/2 cups bread flour or high gluten flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Egg white from one large egg
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • Caraway seeds (optional)
  • Coarse salt (optional)
  • Poppy seeds (optional)
  • Sesame seeds (optional)

 Instructions

In a small bowl, add ½ cup of warm water, sugar and yeast. Do not stir. Let it sit for five minutes, and then stir the yeast and sugar mixture, until it all dissolves in the water.

In a large mixing bowl, add flour and salt. Make a well in the middle and pour in the yeast and sugar mixture. Pour half of the remaining warm water into the well. Mix and stir in the rest of the water as needed to form a moist and firm dough.

On a floured work surface, knead the dough for about 10 minutes until it is smooth and elastic. Work in as much flour as possible to form a firm and stiff dough.

Lightly brush a large bowl with oil and turn the dough to coat. Cover the bowl with a damp dish towel. Let rise in a warm place for 1 hour, until the dough has doubled in size. Punch the dough down, and let it rest for another 10 minutes.

Divide the dough into 8 pieces. Shape each piece into a round ball. Coat a finger in flour, and gently press your finger into the center of each dough ball to form a ring. Twirl the dough around on your finger, stretching the opening to about ⅓ the diameter of the bagel and place on a lightly oiled cookie sheet. Repeat with the remaining dough.

After shaping the dough rounds and placing them on the cookie sheet, cover with a damp tea towel and let rest for 10 minutes.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Reduce the heat. Working in batches, use a slotted spoon or skimmer to lower the bagels into the water. Boil for 2 minutes, and then flip them over for another 2 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and let drain before placing onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Repeat with remaining batches.

Combine the egg white and tablespoon of water. Brush tops and sides of bagels with egg wash. Top bagels with caraway seeds, coarse salt, sesame seeds or poppy seeds.

Bake for 20-30 minutes at 425 degrees, or until bagels are a golden caramel color. Let sit for 30 minutes so the interior continues to bake.

 

Fry Bread – South Dakota

Fry bread is a scrumptious puffy, chewy carb that is associated with state fairs, powwows and fun. Although it’s the official state bread of South Dakota, fry bread has a complicated and painful history. In

Fry Bread - South Dakota

1864, the U.S. government forced Native Americans in Arizona to relocate to an internment camp 300 miles away in New Mexico. Called “The Long Walk,” the government gave them canned goods, sugar, white flour and lard to prevent starvation. Native Americans created fry bread with these staples and it caught on with many tribes in the plains and southwestern states. Many North American Indians now regard fry bread as a symbol of both persistence and pain.

Lots of variations of this recipe exist, some using yeast and some not. We went with a traditional, no yeast version that uses baking powder as its leavening agent. While fry bread is not going to win any nutritional awards – it’s basically fried dough – it’s a delicious once-in-a-while treat that can be either sweet (drizzled with honey, topped with jam, dusted with powdered sugar) or savory (topped with ground beef or turkey and other taco fixings for fry bread tacos).

Visit Crazy Horse Memorial in the Black Hills. Standing 641 feet long and over 500 feet high, this still-in-progress monument accepts no federal funds. Its mission is to protect and preserve the culture, tradition and living heritage of North American Indians.

Fry Bread

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 3 heaping teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup milk
  • ¼ to ½ cup warm water
  • Crisco (for frying)

Instructions

 Place dry ingredients in a medium mixing bowl. Add milk and mix with a fork. Add water a little bit at a time and mix just until the dough comes together (do not overmix!). Cover with a tea towel and let sit 30 minutes.

Heat Crisco in an electric or cast iron skillet to medium heat. Pinch off an egg sized piece of dough. On a work surface dusted with flour, flatten and stretch the dough, working out from the center, until it reaches your desired size. Gently place in hot oil and fry until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Flip dough over and fry on the other side. Remove to paper towels. Repeat with remaining dough.

In Celebration of the Cranberry: Cranberry Nut Bread – Massachusetts

Didja know National Cranberry Day is coming up on November 23? We’ve talked before about how the cranberry is the Bay State’s

Cranberry Nut Bread- Mass.

official state berry, thanks to some lobbying school children. We happen to adore the tart flavor of this lovely little fruit so we bring to you this family recipe that is sure to be a hit in your household too. If you’ve got company coming for Thanksgiving, this is an easy quick bread that you can make ahead of time. Perfect for that crazy Thursday morning when your mother-in-law is dashing about the house looking for her misplaced phone and your brother is wrestling with the kids, causing the dog to bark. Just make some coffee, slice it up, and breakfast is served.

Check out America’s Hometown Thanksgiving Celebration in Plymouth, November 20-22, 2015, with a parade, the New England Food Festival, music and more.

 

Cranberry Nut Bread

  • Servings: 10-12
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • ¾ cup orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon orange zest
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup chopped pecans
  • 1 cup frozen cranberries, chopped in food processor

Instructions

 In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Set aside. In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar with electric mixer until combined. Add orange juice, zest, and egg; mix until combined. Add pecans and cranberries and stir by hand until combined. Add flour mixture and stir by hand until just combined, taking care not to overmix. Pour into two loaf pans lined with parchment paper. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour or until golden brown.

Snick Snack: Zweiback – Kansas

Forget what you think you know about zwieback. This is decidedly not that hard toast stuff you give to babies when they are teething. When folks talk zweiback in the Sunflower State, they are referring to delicious rolls, a little bit richer and saltier than the usual Zweiback - Kansashomemade bun. The Mennonites brought these from Russia, presumably because they traveled well, especially when toasted (thus the name in German which roughly translates to “double baked”). These rolls have a unique shape with a little ball on top of the base of the bun. They are great for Sunday brunch with some butter and jam or to hold your sandwich innards. They also freeze very well.

History buffs will love Fort Larned National Historic Site, which houses a complete and authentic army post from the 1860s. Various living history events will take place Labor Day weekend, September 5-7, 2015, including lectures, carriage rides and artillery and  blacksmith demos.

Zweiback - Kansas

Zweiback

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 2 cups milk
  • 1/4 cup lukewarm water
  • 1/2 cup margarine, butter, or lard
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 5 3/4 to 6 cups flour

Instructions

Heat milk, water and butter or margarine together in a microwave safe bowl or cup until warm, about 100 degrees. Do not let the liquid boil as the yeast will not proof. Sprinkle with yeast and sugar. Let set a few minutes until mixture is bubbling.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the yeast mixture with salt. Gradually add 3 cups sifted flour and beat with an electric mixture for 5 minutes. Add the additional flour and beat until thoroughly combined. Turn out dough onto a well-floured surface and knead by hand for about 8-10 minutes or until dough is smooth and elastic. Place dough into a large bowl coated in oil and cover with a tea towel. Place in a warm spot for about 75 minutes or until dough is doubled in size. Punch down and let dough rise again, about 30-45 minutes. Punch down again. Remove dough to a well-floured surface and knead out any air bubbles.

To form the rolls, divide dough into 24 pieces. Roll each piece by hand until round, then pinch off a large marble sized piece. Place bigger piece on well-greased baking sheet, flatten slightly. In the middle of the roll, make an indentation, then place the smaller ball on top (this will ensure the top will not slide off during baking). Continue until all rolls are formed, making sure to spread out the rolls 2 inches apart. Bake at 375 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until rolls are golden brown.

Clamoring for More:- New Haven White Clam Pizza – Connecticut

The Nutmeg State’s second largest city, New Haven, is identified with the white clam pizza.  If you’ve never tasted the savory sensation that is white clam pizza, well then friends, you’ve been missing out. Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana on Wooster Street claims

New Haven White Clam Pizza

to be the originator of this dish which dates back to the 1960s when the restaurant served little neck clams as an appetizer.  Presumably, Frank didn’t think it much of a stretch to toss some clams and parmesan cheese on top of dough and call it “apizza” (ah-beets as the locals still say).

A couple of tips about white clam pizza: We don’t recommend using canned clams. They will be way too chewy. Frozen will work in a pinch but your best bet, as usual, is freshly steamed. We’ve told you before here and here how to steam clams. It really is easy so don’t be intimidated.  Also, please note that the recipe below makes enough dough for two pizzas but the amount of clams and cheese is for only one pizza. Just double the amounts if you want to make two pizzas.

If you dig all things nautical, check out Mystic Seaport, the nation’s leading maritime museum with four national historic landmark vessels including the 1841 whaleship, the Charles W. Morgan, the country’s oldest commercial ship still in existence.

New Haven White Clam Pizza

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For crust (will make enough for two crusts):

  • I package yeast
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 ½ cups warm water
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 1/2 – 4 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Cooking spray

For pizza (double these amounts if you will be making two pizzas):

  • 25-30 little neck clams
  • 1 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon oregano
  • 1 tablespoon parsley, finely minced
  • Olive oil

Instructions

To make crust: In a large bowl, dissolve yeast and 1 teaspoon sugar in ½ cup warm water. Let sit until mixture begins to foam. Add rest of water and olive oil.  Add 3 ½ cups flour, salt, and remaining sugar. Mix with a stand mixer fitted with dough hooks until well combined. If dough is too sticky add a quarter cup of flour at a time, until dough is smooth and elastic and pulls away from the bowl. Transfer dough to a large bowl that has been coated with cooking spray. Cover with a tea towel and let rise, about 40-55 minutes. Divide into two. Set aside one crust for a different kind of pizza or wrap in plastic wrap and freeze.

To steam clams: Pick through clams and discard any with cracked or damaged shells. Soak for 20 minutes in fresh water. Lift them out of the water bath (do not strain) and brush them vigorously to get rid of any excess sand. Heat 3 to 4 cups of water in a large pot. Turn down heat to medium. Add clams and cover. Steam about 4 to 6 minutes or until the shells just start to open. Do not overcook as clams will cook again on the pizza. Remove from heat and let cool. Discard any clams that do not open. Once shells are cool enough to handle, open shells, extract and chop meat coarsely.

To make pizza:  Preheat oven to 550 degrees with pizza stone inside if using. Place the ball of dough down on a well-floured work surface. Using the heel of your hand, press down to flatten. Lift the dough onto a round pan or pizza paddle sprinkled with corn meal. Continuing pressing and shaping the dough.  If dough is too springy, let rest about 10 minutes until the gluten relaxes, then proceed. Once dough is the appropriate size, press and shape a ½ inch crust on the edge. Brush dough with olive oil. Add Parmesan cheese, oregano, garlic and then clams. If using a pizza paddle, transfer pizza onto baking stone that has been preheating in oven. Bake at 550 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes or until the dough is browned and the cheese is golden. Finish with additional olive oil if desired.

Why Knot? Soft Pretzels – Pennsylvania

As treats go, pretzels have a long history, going back hundreds of years to European bakers. German immigrants who settled in Pennsylvania during the early 1800s were responsible for the pretzel proliferation. Julius Sturgis opened the country’s first

Soft Pretzels - Pennsylvania

 

commercial pretzel bakery in Lancaster County, Pa, in 1861. Rumor has it that the average Philadelphian consumes 12 times as many pretzels as the rest of the population. In 2003, Governor Ed Rendell declared April 26 as National Pretzel Day, to commemorate the commonwealth’s long history with the salty snack. And talk about creative, one Philly pretzel factory recently rolled out a Tim Tebow pretzel after the quarterback signed with the Philadelphia Eagles.

In preparation for the upcoming twisted celebration, you can make soft pretzels at home. We’re not going to lie, the recipe takes some time and is a bit tricky, but the results are so worth it. Soft and warm, these babies are great with a little mustard or some nacho cheese.

A couple of pointers: Rolling out the ropes to 30 inches is not a typo. But you won’t be able to do it in one try. Roll out the ropes one at a time as long as you can get them, then let them rest a bit. The gluten will then relax. Roll them out some more, and you’ll be able to get to 30 inches.   Place the shaped pretzels in the freezer for a couple of hours to prepare them for the alkaline bath. This will allow the pretzels to hold their shape as they are dipped. About that alkaline bath, commercial pretzel bakers use food-grade lye to get that rich, brown color and distinct flavor. But lye is caustic. You can re-create that chestnut brown finish with a baking soda bath. (Baking soda is about 9.5 on the pH scale while lye is about 14, at the top of the scale). Make sure you dip both sides of the pretzel for about 30 seconds total. If you leave out this step, you will have baked bread in the shape of a pretzel.

If you’re near Lancaster, PA, prepare to take a tour of one of the six pretzel factories in the area.

Soft Pretzels - Pennsylvania

Soft Pretzels

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups warm water (heated to 110 degrees)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 package yeast
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 to 4 ½ cups flour
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • Cooking spray
  • 10 cups water
  • 2/3 cup baking soda
  • 1 egg yolk, beaten with 1 tablespoon water
  • Kosher salt

Instructions

Heat 1 ½ cups water in saucepan or microwave. Water should be warm, not hot, to the inside of the wrist. In the large bowl of a stand mixer, add warm water, sugar, salt and yeast. Let sit a few minutes or until yeast starts to bubble. Add flour and butter. Use the dough hooks and mix on low speed until just combined, then switch to medium speed until dough starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl. Cover bowl with a tea towel and let sit in a warm spot for 50 minutes to an hour or until the dough has doubled.

To prepare to roll out the pretzels, first spray the work surface with a generous amount of cooking spray. Punch dough down and divide into 8 equal pieces. Roll out each piece of dough into a long rope. Let sit a few minutes for the gluten to relax, then roll out each piece to 30 inches. Form dough into a pretzel shape by making a U, twisting about two inches from the ends and then pressing the ends into the bottom of the U. Place pretzels on two baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Place in the freezer for at least 2 hours.

When ready to bake pretzels, boil 10 cups of water with 2/3 of a cup baking soda. Remove pretzels from freezer. Dip each pretzel into the alkaline bath for 15 seconds on each side. Place each pretzel back on the baking sheet and brush with the egg yolk mixture, then salt. Bake for 12-14 minutes at 450 degrees or until pretzels turn chestnut brown.

Leave Us Some Lefse – North Dakota

North Dakota, the Roughrider State, celebrates its Northern European influences, especially anything Norwegian. A third of its residents are of Norwegian descent, the highest percentage of any state in the country. Immigration from Norway began around 1870 and these Henriks and Heddas brought the two Ls — lutefisk and lefse.

Lefse

We’ll leave lutefisk for another day, but lefse is nothing more than a potato crepe. Or maybe it’s a potato tortilla? Either way, they are thin and speckled brown from the skillet and are delicious served warm with a bit of cream cheese and jelly or simpler still, with butter and sugar.

Lefse take a bit of effort, but don’t all good things? Start by peeling and cutting up the potatoes and boiling them until they are quite soft, almost falling apart when pierced by a fork. Let the potatoes cool and then put them through a potato ricer. Lumps are fine for mashed potatoes but the consistency here needs to be finer, no lumps allowed. Add the butter, milk and salt and pepper to taste and then refrigerate until the potatoes are cold. You can do this step the day before if you’d like.

When you are ready to make the lefse, add two cups of the potatoes with one cup of the flour. You’ll probably have some potatoes leftover, a bonus as you can eat them for lunch the next day. The mixture will gradually come together and you’ll have a dough that looks like this. Lefse

Divide this dough ball into 16 equal portions.

Lefse dough balls

Now the real fun begins: Rolling the lefse out. Add a cup of flour to a clean mixing bowl. Drop one dough ball into the flour, dusting the dough. Take it out and then gently roll it out with a rolling pin onto a well-floured surface. This might take a few tries until you get the amount of flour needed and how much pressure to apply with the rolling pin. Don’t get frustrated, if the dough is too sticky or holes form while rolling, just form the dough back into a ball, and try again after adding a bit more flour. You’ll want to roll these babies out as thin as possible, 1/8 of an inch or less so that the dough is almost translucent when held up to the light. Gently lift lefse off of surface with a spatula or pastry scraper. 

Lefse

Place onto a heated skillet and cook two to three minutes on each side until golden brown spots appear.

Lefse

Serve them warm, spread with your favorite topping.

Channel your inner Viking and visit the Norsk Hostfest in Minot ND, September 30-October 4, 2014.

Lefse

  • Servings: 3-4
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 1 lb. baking potatoes
  • 4 tablespoons butter or margarine
  • 1/4 cup milk or cream
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1-2 cups flour
  • Vegetable oil
  • Jam with cream cheese, or butter with granulated sugar, for serving

Instructions

Peel and cut potatoes into uniform pieces. Place into a large pot of cold water, with potatoes completely covered. Bring potatoes to a gentle boil until they are soft, about ten minutes. Drain and let cool. Press potatoes through a potato ricer. Add butter, milk and salt and pepper. Mix until ingredients are completely absorbed, adding more salt and pepper if necessary. Refrigerate mixture until cold.

When ready to make the lefse, mix two cups of the potatoes with one cup of flour. The mixture will be grainy at first but will slowly become a ball of dough as you mix. Turn onto a well-floured surface and knead a few times. Divide dough into 16 equal portions. Roll each portion into a little dough ball. Cover dough balls with a clean tea towel and keep covered as you work.

Heat a non-stick pan or a cast iron skillet to medium heat. Add a cup of flour to a clean mixing bowl. Drop one dough ball into the flour, dusting the dough. Remove, then roll out gently with a rolling pin onto a well-floured surface (if dough is too sticky or holes form while rolling, form back into a ball, and add more flour). Roll as thin as possible, 1/8 of an inch or less so that the dough is almost translucent when held up to the light. Gently lift lefse off of surface with a spatula and place onto skillet. Cook 2-3 minutes each side until golden brown spots appear. Transfer onto a plate and cover with a clean tea towel. Repeat with remaining dough balls, rolling out one lesfe as one cooks. If lefse start to stick to pan while cooking, brush the pan with a small amount of vegetable oil.

To serve, spread with your topping of choice and then roll up. Lefse will keep for one week in the fridge or three weeks frozen.

 

Gift of Finest Wheat – Kansas

Kansas produces more wheat than any other state, about 20 percent of the nation’s total production. Fun fact – all the wheat grown in Kansas in one year would fit on a train that stretches from western Kansas clear to the Atlantic Ocean, according to the Kansas Wheat Commission. The Sunflower State actually produces enough wheat to bake 36 billion loaves of bread, enough to feed everyone in the world for about two weeks. Holy moly, that’s a lot of ovens!

Cinnamon rolls

 

Wheat is of course used for all sorts of products (think beer, cereal and pasta) but is most commonly turned into flour. Here’s our favorite cinnamon roll recipe, deliciously decadent with a cream cheese frosting. Oh yes, your home will smell heavenly while they bake. These take a little bit of effort but they are so much better than those rolls in a tube. You can also make the dough the night before, let them rise in the fridge overnight, and then bake them in the morning.

Continue reading Gift of Finest Wheat – Kansas

Bierocks Rock – Nebraska

Americans love their hand-held meat pies. Michigan has the pasty, West Virginia has the pepperoni roll, and Nebraska has the bierock. (Let’s not even start with Central and South American empanadas or the Italian calzone). Just like pepperoni rolls, these savory buns were

Bierock (Nebraska) sign

probably brought to the U.S. by Europeans, specifically Eastern Europeans who immigrated to the Midwest and Plains states beginning at the turn of the century until after WWII. Many of these people were farmers, as they found the land to be similar to their homeland. Bierocks filled the farmers’ lunch pails – they were easy to eat on the go and were filling. Bierocks (pronounced “brook” or Continue reading Bierocks Rock – Nebraska