Category Archives: Chicken Dish

Turkey, Orange and Rosemary Kebabs – Minnesota

The Gopher State is the number one producer of turkey in the country, raising approximately 44 to 46 million birds annually, according to the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association. Turkey

Turkey, Orange and Rosemary Kebabs, Minnesota

has more protein than chicken or beef and is lower in calories and fat, making it a good, heart healthy choice.

Even if summer is slowly slipping away, we couldn’t resist this tasty kebab recipe. We can grill outside until it snows, right?

If you are Twin Cities bound, be sure to check out the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, part of the Walker Arts Center. Forty works are highlighted, including the iconic Spoonbridge and Cherry.

Turkey, Orange and Rosemary Kebabs

  • Servings: 3-4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

• 10 ounces orange marmalade
• 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
• 3 tablespoons soy sauce
• 3-4 sprigs fresh rosemary
• 3-4 cloves garlic, crushed
• 1/4 cup olive oil
• 2 teaspoons orange zest
• 2 pounds boneless turkey breast, cut into 1-inch pieces (can use chicken)
• Salt
• Pepper
• Orange slices, cut thinly (optional)

Instructions
Place marmalade in a small sauce pan and heat until melted. Combine marmalade and next six ingredients (mustard through orange zest) in shallow dish or ziptop bag. Mix well. Liberally salt and pepper the turkey, then add to marinade, tossing until well coated. Allow to marinate for at least 2 hours, longer if you can.

When ready to grill, thread meat on skewers, along with orange slices, if using. Grill the kebabs, turning occasionally, until meat is no longer pink, about 10-12 minutes.

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Chicken Vesuvio – Illinois

We’ve lived in the Chicago area for almost 20 years and have come across some delicious versions of Chicken Vesuvio. Harry Caray’s makes a mean version that they assert dates back to the 1920s, as does the venerable Gene & Georgetti. Although some people argue

Chicken Vesuvio

that Chicken Vesuvio has its roots in New York, New Jersey or even southern Italy, we are swayed by the claim that this dish was invented at Vesuvio Restaurant which was located on Wacker Drive in the 1930s. That, and the fact that we never heard of this dish until we moved here.

The components of Chicken Vesuvio are pretty straightforward. Bone-in chicken pieces are pan seared. Potatoes are added, usually with a generous amount of garlic. Oregano (or some other herb, sometimes rosemary) is sprinkled throughout the dish, and a white wine sauce melds all the flavors together. Sometimes additional vegetables are added, like mushroom (like we did) or artichokes. The dish is finished in the oven and peas are added at the last moment. Where ever it came from, no one can argue that this dish is delicious at every bite.

Hurry to get your tickets for Chicago Gourmet 2016, September 24-25, 2016. This premier food festival has an impressive array of celebrity chefs, cooking demonstrations and tastings.

Chicken Vesuvio

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

    • 1/2 cup olive oil, divided
    • 3 potatoes, quartered and then sliced 1/4 inch thick
    • 5-6 garlic cloves, minced
    • Salt
    • Pepper
    • 3 pounds chicken pieces, bone in
    • 8-10 baby portabella mushrooms, quartered
    • 3/4 cup white wine
    • 3/4 cup chicken stock
    • 2-3 teaspoons oregano
    • 1 cup frozen peas

Instructions

In a large, oven proof pan, heat ¼ cup of the cup of olive oil over medium heat. Add potatoes and garlic and cook until browned. Remove to a plate and set aside.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Season chicken pieces with salt and pepper. Add ¼ cup olive oil to pan. Working in batches if necessary, add chicken pieces. Cook skin side down until browned. Turn skin side up, then add mushrooms. Cook 3-4 minutes or until mushrooms are browned. Return potatoes to the pan. Add stock, wine and oregano. Cook until liquid is reduced by half.

Place pan in oven to finish, about 40 minutes. Add the frozen peas during the last five minutes of baking.

Laissez Les Bon Temps Rouler: Chicken, Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya – Louisiana

Next week is Mardi Gras (February 9, 2016) so the folks down in New Orleans have been celebrating a while now with parties, parades and all manner of revelry.  Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday) celebrations have actually been around for thousands of years as

Chicken, Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya

festivals of spring and fertility but when Christianity was established, the holiday became associated with the last day of merry making and eating rich food before Lent.

Many dishes are associated with Mardi Gras including crawfish etouffee, gumbo and this jambalaya, a rice based dish that is great for serving a crowd.

If you wondered about the difference between Creole versus Cajun food, one basic difference is that Creole food uses tomatoes while Cajun food generally does not. Since we opted out of tomatoes with this dish, I guess we made Cajun jambalaya but you can use tomatoes if you want to make it Creole. Just add them when the other vegetables go in.

The protein in jambalaya can vary but we went with the very traditional chicken, shrimp and sausage. Feel free to modify based on your tastes.

Mardi Gras will be reaching a full fledged fervor this weekend with parades from the so-called “super krewes” of Orpheus, Bacchus and Endymion which feature the most massive and detailed floats. Check out www.mardigrasneworleans.com for a full schedule.

Chicken, Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil
  • 3-4 pounds chicken thighs
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 1 rib celery, chopped
  • 1 large green pepper, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, diced
  • 3 tablespoons parsley, minced
  • 1 pound raw shrimp
  • 6 smoked sausages (Andouille or Polish)
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 ½ cups long grain white rice
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 cup water

 Instructions

In a large, heavy pot, heat the oil on medium heat until hot. Cook the chicken pieces with the skin on until golden brown on both sides. Remove chicken and set aside. Add the shrimp and sauté  2 minutes each side. Remove shrimp and set aside. Add all the vegetables into the pot and cook on medium until the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the sausage and seasonings and cook until the sausage is browned. Add the chicken, broth and water. Stir gently, making sure chicken is submerged. Raise the heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce to low, then cover the pot. Simmer for 35 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and bring heat to medium for 10 minutes or until liquid is almost absorbed. During the last 10 minutes, remove chicken. When it is cool enough to handle, remove meat, discard skin and bones and add shredded meat back into jambalaya. Add the shrimp and cook until heated through.

Oh Mommy Umami: Fish Sauce Wings – Oregon

At first blush, fish sauce wings do not sound particularly appetizing. After all, this pungent Southeast Asian sauce made from anchovies and fermented in wooden barrels is intensely flavored and

Fish Sauce Wings

something of an acquired taste. But diners in Portland, Oregon, have been clamoring for fish sauce wings ever since Andy Ricker maxed out his credit cards in 2007 to open Pok Pok restaurant. Insanely popular there, Ricker opened outposts in NYC and LA in the intervening years.

These wings are a bit sweet, a bit salty, a bit crunchy and a bit spicy, and have been described by Ricker as “umami bombs.” We bet that you too will become strangely addicted before you can finish the batch and lick your fingers.

What goes great with chicken wings? Beer! Head on over to the Hood River Hops Fest, September 26, 2015, which showcases fresh hops beers from 36 Northwest breweries.

Fish Sauce Wings

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Difficulty: moderate
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 Ingredients

  • 8 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/8 cup warm water
  • 2 lbs. chicken wings, separated
  • 1/2 cup fish sauce
  • 1/2 cup confectioner’s sugar
  • 1 cup rice flour
  • 1/4 cup tempura batter
  • Vegetable oil
  • 1-2 teaspoons Sriracha sauce (optional)

Instructions

For marinade: Combine garlic, salt and warm water in a small bowl. Let set for a few minutes. Combine fish sauce and sugar in a deep dish or marinade tray. Using a mesh sieve, take garlic mixture and mash garlic through the sieve into the marinade tray until all the liquid is gone. Scrape out any leftover garlic that did not go through the sieve and reserve in a small dish for later. Add chicken to the marinade. Marinate for 6-8 hours or overnight, turning chicken occasionally.

For frying chicken: Heat oil to 325 degrees. Fry garlic until golden brown, remove with a slotted spot and reserve. Combine rice flour and tempura batter. Remove chicken from marinade and reserve the marinade. Coat chicken in flour mixture. Fry in batches for 10-12 minutes or until golden brown. While chicken is frying, take leftover marinade and add to a wok along with ¼ cup water and Sriracha sauce if desired. Boil mixture for 1-2 minutes. Keep warm. As chicken finishes, remove pieces with tongs and place in sauce, tossing each piece completely. Remove chicken and sprinkle with half of the fried garlic. Fry remaining batch of chicken, tossing in sauce and then adding garlic. Serve immediately.

Broke Da Mouth: Chicken Long Rice – Hawaii

From the sandy shores of Waikiki on Oahu, to the summit of Haleakala on Maui, to the deep valley gorge of the Waimea Canyon on Kauai, the Hawaiian Islands are a sight to behold. The Aloha State, the nation’s fiftieth, has a unique culinary culture, with influences from China, Korea, Japan, the Philippines, and Portugal.

Chicken Long Rice - Hawaii

If you are invited to a  local’s home for dinner or attend a Hawaiian luau, you will likely be served Chicken Long Rice. Don’t look for rice in this dish, there is none. Long rice refers to cellophane noodles (also called mung bean noodles) which give this dish its distinctive Chinese flavor. We adapted a recipe from Doreen Fang and added julienned carrots for crunch and texture. Fang prefers Aloha Shoyu soy sauce which is a local soy sauce that tastes a little less salty and tangy than Chinese or Japanese soy sauce. Don’t worry if you can’t find it, just substitute reduced sodium soy sauce. If a dish is broke da mouth, that means it’s very delicious in Hawaiian pidgin. Yep, consider our mouths broke.

If you are a lucky enough to be headed to Hawaii, check out the Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau’s website which lists luaus on all of the islands. At luaus, the food is usually served buffet style and is a great place to try a number of authentic Hawaiian dishes.

Chicken Long Rice

  • Servings: 4-5
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

For marinade:

  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce (Aloha Shoyu brand preferred)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 teaspoons sugar

For chicken and noodles:

  • 6 ounces cellophane noodles (mung bean threads)
  • 1 ½ lbs. chicken breast, cut in strips
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 carrots, julienned (optional)
  • 3 ounces cremini or shitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 3 green onions, sliced and divided
  • 8 ounces chicken broth
  • Soy sauce to taste

Instructions

For the marinade: Combine all ingredients into a large bowl and mix with fork. Add sliced chicken. Marinate in the refrigerator for one hour.

For noodles: Place noodles in a large bowl. Cover with boiling water. Let stand ten minutes or until soft. Drain well. Chop into smaller pieces if desired. Set aside.

To finish: Heat saute pan or wok to medium heat. Add 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. When bead of water sizzles in the pan, add carrot. Cook until tender. Remove and set aside. Add 2 tablespoons of the oil. When hot, add marinated chicken. Cook for 6-8 minutes. Add mushrooms, and 2 green onions. Cook until chicken is cooked through. Add cellophane noodles, broth, soy sauce and carrot, tossing well to combine. Top with remaining green onion.

Whose Stew is it Anyway? Brunswick Stew – Virginia

Virginia is for lovers and we’re feeling the culinary love for Brunswick Stew.

Brunswick Stew - Virginia

 

Legend has it that Jimmy Matthews, a camp cook, created this stew for a hunting party back in 1828 on the banks of the Nottoway River. Other places have claimed Brunswick Stew as their own, most notably Brunswick, Georgia, spawning some serious stew wars. Georgia versions tend to have beef or pork as the protein while the Virginia version uses chicken. Thankfully for us, neither uses squirrel, the primary protein when the dish was created in the nineteenth century. This stew is hearty thanks to the addition of corn, potatoes and butterbeans, and the Brunswick Stewmaster’s Association asserts that it isn’t done until the spoon can stand up in the middle of the stew pot.

Brunswick Stew - Virginia

Head out to the Taste of Brunswick Festival in Alberta, Virginia, October 11, 2014, where you can sample lots of versions during the stew cook off.

Brunswick Stew

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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Recipe adapted from Brunswick Stewmaster’s Association, used with permission.

Ingredients

  • 6 bone-in chicken thighs, skin removed
  • 1 carrot, cut into large pieces
  • 1 stalk celery, cut into large pieces
  • 1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup chopped yellow onions
  • 3 medium potatoes, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 1 can (28 oz.) crushed tomatoes
  • 2 cans (15 oz.) small butterbeans or lima beans, drained
  • 2 cans (7 oz.) white shoe peg corn, drained
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Vegetable oil

 Instructions

In a large pot, place chicken with enough water to cover it. Add carrot, celery peppercorns and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, then simmer until meat falls off bone, about 45 minutes. Remove chicken but reserve stock. Shred meat. In a separate pot, sauté the chopped onion in vegetable oil until translucent. Add meat, potatoes, tomatoes and salt and peppers, plus some of the stock to desired consistency. Simmer slowly, stirring often to prevent sticking, until potatoes are tender, approximately 30 minutes. Add additional stock if stew becomes too thick. Add butterbeans and corn, heat an additional 10 to15 minutes or until beans and corn are heated through. Season again with salt and peppers before serving.

 

 

Feel the Need for Spiedies – New York

Never heard of spiedies? That must mean you aren’t a native of the Southern Tier of New York, specifically Binghamton, where it is believed Italian immigrants introduced the famous marinated-meat sandwich in the 1920s. The name spiedie likely comes from the

Spiedies

Italian words for “spit” (as in rotisserie) and “skewer” – and accordingly, the sauced-up meat in spiedies (generally chicken, pork or lamb) is threaded on skewers, cooked on a barbecue grill and served on slices of soft Italian bread. You can buy commercial spiedies sauce as it’s called, but it’s very easy to make at home with Continue reading Feel the Need for Spiedies – New York

Just Plain Peachy Keen – Georgia

Georgia is a state chock-full of agricultural “P’s” – pecans, peanuts, poultry and its official state fruit, the beloved peach. It may surprise you that the peach received this designation only as recently as 1995 – even though its history in the state dates back to the 1500s, when Franciscan monks who had first planted peach trees in Florida brought them north to what is today coastal Georgia. We’re glad

Baked Chicken w Peaches

Continue reading Just Plain Peachy Keen – Georgia