Category Archives: Drink

Rum Runner Cocktail – Florida

The Rum Runner cocktail evokes white sandy beaches, warm ocean breezes and sherbet colored sunsets. The drink was purportedly invented in the 1950s at the Holiday Isle Tiki Bar in Islamorada,

Rum Runner Cocktail - Florida

Florida, to get rid of an excess supply of rum and other liqueurs. This tasty concoction is a like a mini visit to the tropics and a great summer time sipper.

You can camp, bike, birdwatch, canoe, fish or hike at Everglades National Park, near Homestead. Wildlife sightings could include manatees, gators and maybe even a Florida panther.

Rum Runner Cocktail

  • Servings: 1 drink
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • Ice
  • 1 oz. orange juice
  • 1 oz. pineapple juice
  • 1 oz. banana liqueur
  • 1 oz. blackberry liqueur
  • 1 oz. light rum
  • 1 oz. dark rum
  • Splash of grenadine
  • Orange slices (for garnish)

Instructions

In a cocktail shaker, add juices, liqueurs, rum and grenadine. Shake well. Pour over ice. Garnish with orange slices.

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Honey Lavender Lemonade – Utah

It may surprise you to know that almost every state has a state insect. Utah’s state insect is the European honeybee, so designed in

Honey Lavender Lemonade - Utah

1983 after the lobbying efforts of schoolchildren. What’s more, Utah adopted the beehive as its official emblem in 1959. The beehive symbolizes the industry, perseverance and thrift of Utah’s first settlers.

Fitting then, that we should feature a recipe with honey as one of culinary lavenderthe ingredients. We recently were gifted with some pure culinary lavender (thanks Mom!) and thought that it would be the perfect addition to this honey lemonade. We love how the lavender turns the lemonade slightly pink. The taste is subtle, but if you want a stronger lavender flavor, add a bit more than one tablespoon and/or steep for longer than 30 minutes.

Visit Arches National Park near Moab, Utah. The park is a red rock paradise with over 2,000 natural stone arches.

Honey Lavender Lemonade

  • Servings: 5
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 5 cups water, divided
  • 1 cup honey
  • 1 tablespoon culinary lavender
  • 1 cup lemon juice, freshly squeezed

Instructions

In a medium saucepan, add 2 ½ cups water and honey. On medium heat, bring to steaming or until honey dissolves. Remove from heat, add lavender. Let steep 20-30 minutes. Strain liquid into a pitcher. Add lemon juice and additional 2 ½ cups water. Mix well. Serve chilled.

Cranberry Mimosa – Massachusetts

Just because Thanksgiving is over does not mean that we are done with the cranberry. The tart little cranberry is the Bay State’s official state berry and cranberry juice is the official state beverage. The

Cranberry Mimosa

name cranberry is thought to be a bungled derivation of “craneberry,” so called by the Pilgrims because the spring blossoms resemble the head and bill of a Sandhill crane.

Because you can never have too many cocktail options with the holidays approaching, we bring you the cranberry mimosa. This fun little drink whips up with just a few ingredients and is light and refreshing,

Main Street, Nantucket, is the site of the 43rd Annual Christmas Stroll, December 2-4, 2016. Visit historic homes decorated for the holiday, visit the craft show and watch Santa arrive via a Coast Guard Cutter.

Cranberry Mimosa

  • Servings: 1 drink
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • Orange slices
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1/4 cup cranberry juice
  • 3/4 cup champagne or sparkling wine
  • 2-3 fresh cranberries (optional)

Instructions

Take orange slice and rub on rim of wine glass. Sprinkle sugar on plate, turn glass upside down and rub the rim of the glass in the sugar. Add orange slice to glass, then cranberry juice, then champagne. Add a few cranberries as a garnish if desired.

Feeling Punchy: Picon Punch – Nevada

Picon Punch is an old libation with a long history in the Silver State. We’ve talked before about how the Basque people — those from a region in Europe about the size of Rhode Island that includes both

Picon Punch

Spain and France — immigrated to Nevada and other parts of the west during the mid-nineteenth century. Many of them were sheepherders and they set up boardinghouses across the state as way-stations for themselves. The boardinghouses that remain are now restaurants and the Picon Punch is a product of those establishments. Some lament the drink used to be better when Amer Picon was available in the United States (alas, it is only available France) so we used Torani Amer which is a common substitution. Having no frame of reference for what used-to-be, we enjoyed the caramel, orange and brandy flavors of this cocktail.

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area near Las Vegas features a 13-mile scenic loop, as well as opportunities for hiking, biking and rock climbing.

Picon Punch

  • Servings: 1 drink
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 2 ½ ounces Torani Amer
  • 1/2 ounce grenadine
  • 1/2 ounce brandy
  • Crushed ice
  • 1-2 ounces club soda
  • Lemon twist

Instructions

Mix Torani Amer, grenadine, and brandy in a cocktail shaker. Add crushed ice to glass. Pour brandy mixture over ice. Top with club soda and a lemon twist.

Guest Post: Atole

Hello lovely readers of StateEats! I’m Chrissy, known to most as Chrissy, to others CB, my family Lulubelle and to my readers, The Hungary Buddha. I’m so happy to be guest posting for Kat and Kloh. As they’ve been cooking their way around the U.S., I’ve been cooking my way around the world, and it was not lost on either of us that there is a ton of overlap between the two ideas. After all, our country is indeed a nation of immigrants, and there are little reminders of the old world from whence they came in every bite we take.

Kat asked me to share a recipe for atole, and I’m more than happy to do so because it’s breakfast! And I love breakfast! Plus, it’s perfect for this time of the year when the weather is oh so cold and frightful.

Atole

For some background, I grew up eating a hot, freshly prepared breakfast every weekday morning. #Spoiled. Once in a while we had cereal, but more often than not we had pancakes, french toast, quiche, cheesy toast, cream of wheat, crepes, wheatena…the list goes on. Atole, a warm cornmeal drink with central Mexican and central American origins, would have fit seamlessly in my childhood morning rotation and get me started on the right foot. Especially popular for breakfast, it is also consumed for special occasions, namely on el dia de los meuetos (Day of the Dead) or at Christmas time with chocolate (called champurrado). Because it’s made in the same manner as oatmeal or cream of wheat, it can be as thin or as thick as you like, making it either more drink-like or porridge-like.

I opted for the latter, and I boiled my atole to medium thickness. However, for a gluten-free breakfast on the go, opt for a thinner, more coffee-cup portable version.

Atole

To make the champurrado (chocolate atole), add 2 ounces of chopped Mexican chocolate into the recipe below.

Atole

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  •  1 ¼ cup almond milk (or other dairy variety)
  • 1 ¼ cup water
  • 1/4 cup masa harina
  • 2 TB brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • Almonds, to garnish and add crunch (optional)

Instructions

Whisk the milk, water, masa, sugar and cinnamon in a medium saucepan until smooth.  Place the pan over medium heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to medium-low and stir until it reaches desired thickness, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in vanilla and serve in mugs or bowls.

Note: To make the champurrado (chocolate atole), add 2 ounces of chopped Mexican chocolate into the recipe above.

 

 

Check the Cupboard: Coffee Cabinet – Rhode Island

A coffee cabinet is a delicious concoction, only it’s too bad no one outside of Providence or Warwick knows what the heck it is. Let us elucidate. In other parts of the country, a cabinet is simply a

Coffee Cabinet - Rhode Island

milkshake or a frappe. This ice cream drink is called a cabinet, supposedly because it is made in a blender which is stored in the cabinet. Who knew?

A key ingredient of a coffee cabinet is coffee syrup and in the Ocean State that syrup  is usually made by Autocrat, a company based in Lincoln. Autocrat is sometimes hard to find outside of New England but don’t despair, you can easily make coffee syrup at home in less time than it takes to watch an episode of Family Guy. Simply boil coffee with sugar and then simmer until the liquid reduces.

The cabinet recipe can easily be adapted if you’re vegan by subbing out the regular ice cream and milk for soy or almond milk products. And if you want to hold the ice cream and just mix the coffee syrup with milk, you’ll have what’s called a coffee milk, which is the official beverage of Rhode Island.

If you want to see how the other half lived during the mid to late 19th century, check out the Newport Mansions, many situated on beautiful Bellevue Avenue in Newport. Tour Marble House, The Breakers, The Elms, Chateau-sur-Mer, and get your Vanderbilt on.

Rhode Island Coffee Cabinet

  • Servings: 1 drink
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

For the coffee syrup:

  • 1/2 cup strong brewed coffee or espresso
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the cabinet:

  • 2 tablespoons coffee syrup
  • 1 large scoop coffee ice cream
  • 3/4 cup milk

Instructions 

For the coffee syrup: Combine coffee in sugar in a small saucepan. Heat on medium until boiling. Turn down to low and simmer for approximately 15 minutes or until liquid is reduced. Remove from heat. Add vanilla and let cool.

For the cabinet: Place coffee syrup, ice cream and milk in a blender. Puree until frothy. If too thick, add a bit of milk, or if too thin, add a bit of ice cream. Pour into a tall glass for serving.

Get Your Two Lips on Some Juleps: Mint Juleps – Kentucky

Hey racing fans, it’s Kentucky Derby season! The quintessential drink to quaff is the Mint Julep. The signature drink of Churchill Downs since 1938 when they first began serving it in souvenir cups

Mint Juleps - Kentucky

for 75 cents, this delicious concoction is easy to make at home with just a few ingredients. Churchill Downs now serves over 80,000 mint juleps during the two-day Derby.

The trick to this drink is making the mint simple syrup a day or two beforehand. The simple syrup gives the drink a minty oomph that simply muddling the mint leaves won’t do.

The key ingredient is of course, Kentucky Bourbon. If you get the chance to visit Louisville you must designate a driver and then hit the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, which offers tours of nine different bourbon distilleries. Buy the best Kentucky Bourbon you can afford for this drink, it’s worth every sip.

Bust out your fancy hats and make your way to Louisville on May 1 and 2 for the 2015 Kentucky Derby.

Mint Juleps

  • Servings: 2 drinks
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

For mint simple syrup:

  • ½ cup water
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 bunch mint

For cocktails:

  • 4 tablespoons mint simple syrup
  • 4 ounces of Kentucky bourbon
  • 4-6 mint leaves, crushed
  • Crushed ice
  • Confectioners sugar (optional)

Instructions

For mint simple syrup: Place water and sugar in saucepan. Heat on medium heat until sugar is dissolved. Add mint. When cool, place in a glass container overnight in fridge. Remove mint after 24 hours.

For cocktail: Add mint simple syrup and bourbon to cocktail shaker. Shake well. Add crushed iced into two glasses. Divide cocktail into glasses. Add mint leaves. Top with confectioners sugar if desired.

 

 

Not so Thorny: Prickly Pear Margaritas – Arizona

Arizona already has some unique state symbols. Official state neckwear? The bolo tie. Official state fossil? Petrified wood. Official state mammal? The ringtail. We in the StateEats Kitchen propose the Prickly Pear Margarita as the official state cocktail of Arizona. We’re pretty sure that no other state has one.

Prickly Pear Margarita - Arizona

Prickly pear cacti are found all over the arid regions of the U.S. southwest. Prickly pear branches look like paddles and are often cooked and eaten as a vegetable. The fruit – also known as tuna – are thought to have anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties, according to the Mayo Clinic. The fruit also may lessen the effects of a hangover. So, if you have it in a cocktail, that means you won’t feel lousy the next day, right?? Hmmmm, more research is required.

Sure, you can find commercially prepared prickly pear syrup. But homemade is always better; you can control the ingredients and the amount of sugar. You can find tuna in Latin-American markets across the country. Choose fruit that is firm, with no bruises or brown spots. If you are lucky, the thorns will already have been removed. If not, wear gloves and remove the thorns with a sharp paring knife.

Look at the beautiful color when you slice these babies open!

prickly pear fruit

Scoop out the flesh with a spoon.

prickly pear fruit

 

Once pureed in the food processor it will look like this.

pureed prickly pear fruit

 

Strain the flesh into a fine sieve or a colander lined with cheesecloth. This will remove the seeds and pulp. Transfer the strained puree to a medium sized sauce pan and add the water, sugar, cinnamon stick and mint. When the sugar is dissolved (after about 20 minutes of simmering), strain again. Add the vanilla extract. Let cool before using.

The flavor of the syrup is rather subtle with hints of mint and cinnamon but just look at the gorgeous color of this drink.

Prickly Pear Margaritas

If you don’t imbibe, you can also use the syrup to flavor lemonade, iced tea, smoothies, yogurt, or even over vanilla ice cream.

So what do you say Arizona Legislature? Not such a thorny dilemma to us.

Arizona Cocktail Week is February 14-21, 2015, in Phoenix. Join professional mixologists for lectures, seminars, dinners, competitions and of course, tastings. The grand finale of the week is National Margarita Day on February 22. Enjoy a free(!!) Latin-themed party with mariachi, a live DJ, cocktail samples, tequila education stations, and food pairings at the Hotel Valley Ho pool in Scottsdale.

Prickly Pear Margaritas

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For Syrup:

  • 2 1/2 pounds prickly pears
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • Handful of fresh mint
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For Cocktail:

  • 4 ounces prickly pear syrup
  • 4 ounces tequila blanco
  • 1 ounce triple sec
  • 3 ounces fresh squeezed lime juice
  • Ice
  • Kosher salt (optional – for the rim of the glass)
  • Lime slices (optional – for garnish)

Instructions

For Syrup:

Scrape off any thorns off with a sharp paring knife, taking care not to touch with bare hands. Cut the ends off the prickly pears, then slice the pears in half and scoop out the flesh with a spoon. Put flesh into a food processor and process until pureed. Strain this mixture through a fine sieve or a colander lined with cheese cloth. The seeds and pulp will be left behind yielding about 2 cups of liquid. Transfer the liquid into a medium saucepan. Add water, sugar, cinnamon stick and mint. Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to low and let simmer 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. All of the sugar should be dissolved. Add the vanilla. Strain again. Let completely cool before mixing in a cocktail.

For Cocktail:

Add syrup, liquors and lime juice to a cocktail shaker. Add ice. Shake vigorously. Strain into two margarita glasses rimmed with salt, if desired. Garnish with lime slices.