Category Archives: Main Dish

Whose Stew is it Anyway? Brunswick Stew – Virginia

Virginia is for lovers and we’re feeling the culinary love for Brunswick Stew.

Brunswick Stew - Virginia

 

Legend has it that Jimmy Matthews, a camp cook, created this stew for a hunting party back in 1828 on the banks of the Nottoway River. Other places have claimed Brunswick Stew as their own, most notably Brunswick, Georgia, spawning some serious stew wars. Georgia versions tend to have beef or pork as the protein while the Virginia version uses chicken. Thankfully for us, neither uses squirrel, the primary protein when the dish was created in the nineteenth century. This stew is hearty thanks to the addition of corn, potatoes and butterbeans, and the Brunswick Stewmaster’s Association asserts that it isn’t done until the spoon can stand up in the middle of the stew pot.

Brunswick Stew - Virginia

Head out to the Taste of Brunswick Festival in Alberta, Virginia, October 11, 2014, where you can sample lots of versions during the stew cook off.

Brunswick Stew

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Recipe adapted from Brunswick Stewmaster’s Association, used with permission.

Ingredients

  • 6 bone-in chicken thighs, skin removed
  • 1 carrot, cut into large pieces
  • 1 stalk celery, cut into large pieces
  • 1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup chopped yellow onions
  • 3 medium potatoes, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 1 can (28 oz.) crushed tomatoes
  • 2 cans (15 oz.) small butterbeans or lima beans, drained
  • 2 cans (7 oz.) white shoe peg corn, drained
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Vegetable oil

 Instructions

In a large pot, place chicken with enough water to cover it. Add carrot, celery peppercorns and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, then simmer until meat falls off bone, about 45 minutes. Remove chicken but reserve stock. Shred meat. In a separate pot, sauté the chopped onion in vegetable oil until translucent. Add meat, potatoes, tomatoes and salt and peppers, plus some of the stock to desired consistency. Simmer slowly, stirring often to prevent sticking, until potatoes are tender, approximately 30 minutes. Add additional stock if stew becomes too thick. Add butterbeans and corn, heat an additional 10 to15 minutes or until beans and corn are heated through. Season again with salt and peppers before serving.

 

 

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BPT is GR8: Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich – Iowa

The breaded pork tenderloin — or BPT for those in the know — is such a simple thing. Just a piece of pork tenderloin pounded thin, dipped in an egg wash, battered, then fried.

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A restaurant in Indiana actually claims to have invented the BPT, but when it comes to pork, Iowa is the country’s top producer, with over 10 billion pounds produced in 2012. Heavens to piggy! The BPT is very close to its German cousin, the schnitzel, the only real difference being that schnitzel is pan fried while the BPT takes a deep oil bath. You can find BPTs all over the Hawkeye State in drive-ins, dive bars, and diners.

Continue reading BPT is GR8: Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich – Iowa

Pecan Crusted Trout – Wyoming

Ah, Wyoming. Big sky country. From Yellowstone National Park and the Grand Teton National Park in the northwest, Devils Tower in the northeast, to Fossil Butte Monument in the southwest, the Cowboy State is hardly lacking in scenic trails for hiking or biking, breathtaking vistas for wildlife watching, and winding rivers for boating, rafting and fishing.

Pecan Crusted TroutThe cutthroat trout is the official state fish of Wyoming. This fish with four subspecies found in the state used to swim in abundance but their numbers have dwindled in recent years due to development, drought and introduction of non-native trout species that overwhelmed the cutthroat. Some conservation groups petitioned the federal government to place the cutthroat on the endangered species list but were unsuccessful. Conservationists are still concerned, particularly with the native Yellowstone cutthroat.

But don’t worry, most of the trout available in U.S. supermarkets is farmed-raised according to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch. It is marketed as rainbow, golden or steelhead trout and because it’s sustainable and abundant, it’s considered a “best choice.” This recipe pairs the flaky fish with the nutty crunch of pecans, a flavor duo made in heaven.

Taste of the Tetons is coming to Jackson Hole, September 7, 2014, part of the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival.

Pecan Crusted Trout

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup pecans
  • 1/2 cup corn flake crumbs
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
  • 1/2 tablespoon chopped rosemary leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 trout fillets
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon coarse ground mustard

Instructions

Toast pecans by placing them in a skillet on medium heat, continually tossing the nuts in the pan so they do not burn. Cook until the nuts brown just a bit and you can smell them toasting, about 5 minutes. Once cool to the touch, chop finely or pulse in the food processor a few times.

Combine the chopped nuts with the other dry ingredients and the chopped herbs. In a separate bowl, combine butter and mustard. Brush the mustard mixture over the fish fillets. Add nut mixture, pressing firmly to the fish so it adheres. Transfer the fish to a baking sheet coated with cooking spray, crust side up. Baked in preheated oven at 450 degrees for 10 minutes or until fish is flaky.

 

 

Deep Dish Pizza is Numero Uno – Illinois

No other place in the country embraces deep dish pizza like Chicago. This delicious amalgam of buttery crust, gooey mozzarella cheese

Deep Dish Pizza - Illinois

and tangy tomato sauce — a definite knife and fork affair — has been around since at least the 1940s but who first created the dish is bitterly disputed in pizza-centric circles. Pizzeria Uno claims that proprietors Ike Sewell and Ric Riccardo came up with the recipe but no documentation exists to support this claim, according to the Chicago Tribune. Two employees of Pizzeria Uno, Rudy Malnati, Sr., and Alice Mae Redmond may have been the true inventors. Continue reading Deep Dish Pizza is Numero Uno – Illinois

Juicy Lucy – Minnesota

The origins of the first Juicy Lucy — a cheese-stuffed burger — are a bit murky. Our theory is that a Jonas, Sven or Nils from days of yore craved a tasty morsel to ward off the ten or so months of winter in the Land of 10,000 Lakes. Sounds good, right?

Juicy Lucy

Two venerable Minneapolis institutions each claim to have invented the carnivorous concoction and each claim to make the best Juicy Lucy. Twin Cities dwellers fall into two camps: pro Matt’s and pro 5-8 Club and the rivalry is similar to the cheesesteak battle between Geno’s and Pat’s on the south side of Philly. Matt’s claims Continue reading Juicy Lucy – Minnesota

Feel the Need for Spiedies – New York

Never heard of spiedies? That must mean you aren’t a native of the Southern Tier of New York, specifically Binghamton, where it is believed Italian immigrants introduced the famous marinated-meat sandwich in the 1920s. The name spiedie likely comes from the

Spiedies

Italian words for “spit” (as in rotisserie) and “skewer” – and accordingly, the sauced-up meat in spiedies (generally chicken, pork or lamb) is threaded on skewers, cooked on a barbecue grill and served on slices of soft Italian bread. You can buy commercial spiedies sauce as it’s called, but it’s very easy to make at home with Continue reading Feel the Need for Spiedies – New York

Some Fin Tasty, Salmon Bites – Alaska

We didn’t have to mullet over too much, King salmon is dolphinitely our pick for Alaska. The state fish, also known as Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, can weigh over 100 pounds. Holy Mackerel!

Slamon Bites

Just thinking about the size of the Land of the Midnight Sun gives us a haddock, it’s twice the size of Texas with over 573,000 square miles. We don’t mean to carp on and on, but with 34,000 miles of coastline, seafood is a top commodity for the state, providing over half of the nation’s commercially harvest fish.

Continue reading Some Fin Tasty, Salmon Bites – Alaska

Just Plain Peachy Keen – Georgia

Georgia is a state chock-full of agricultural “P’s” – pecans, peanuts, poultry and its official state fruit, the beloved peach. It may surprise you that the peach received this designation only as recently as 1995 – even though its history in the state dates back to the 1500s, when Franciscan monks who had first planted peach trees in Florida brought them north to what is today coastal Georgia. We’re glad

Baked Chicken w Peaches

Continue reading Just Plain Peachy Keen – Georgia

A True Crabby Patty – Delaware

Delaware, the second smallest state area wise, obtained its nickname “the First State” due to the fact that it was the first of the 13 colonies to ratify the Constitution. Delaware is known for its stunning beaches, and whether noshing on Grotto Pizza or Thrasher’s Fries in Rehoboth, or grabbing a cone at King’s Ice Cream in Lewes, you must save room for crab cakes.

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While tourism generated $400 million in state and local government taxes/fees in 2010, the commercial blue crab fishery is also vital to Delaware’s economy, adding at least $7 million annually to the Delaware estuary region in 2005. While it’s fun to steam some blue crabs, roll out the butcher paper, grab your mallet and beer and get to picking, crab cakes fill your belly for a lot less work. Crab cakes from this part of the country are made with very little filler, just a bit Continue reading A True Crabby Patty – Delaware

Mississippi’s Mighty Fish

 Mississippi’s famed Delta region in the northwest section of the state is well known for its flat agricultural expanse, its home-grown blues music, and its whiskered (and very tasty) ambassador – the catfish. If you’ve never tried catfish, you’re missing out on one of the South’s most iconic foods. This quirky-looking freshwater swimmer is found on the menu in fish shacks and at family and community gatherings all throughout the South, and particularly in Mississippi, which is the nation’s largest producer of farm-raised catfish. For traditionalists, this fish is typically deep-fried in a cornmeal coating and served with hushpuppies and coleslaw, but it also can be easily broiled, grilled or baked. We opted to try out a recipe that serves up a heaping helping of flavor with the ease that comes from throwing a pan in the oven.

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This fish is so treasured in the state that the area around Humphreys County (including the town of Belzoni) is known as the Continue reading Mississippi’s Mighty Fish