Category Archives: New Hampshire

Pumpkin Pie Bars – New Hampshire

Pumpkin became the state fruit of New Hampshire in 2006. The New Hampshire Pumpkin Festival, first held in Keene, New Hampshire, and now in Laconia, set a world record in 2013 with over

Pumpkin Pie Bars - New Hampshire

30,000 lit jack-o-lanterns. The lit pumpkins are housed on a huge scaffolding tower and honestly, it’s a sight to behold.

Because Thanksgiving is coming and because we can’t get enough of all things pumpkin we decided to bring you these pumpkin pie bars. They give you all the sumptuous goodness of pumpkin pie without the hassle of rolling out pie dough. Bake these and stash them in your freezer for the next time you are craving pumpkin pie.

The Portsmouth Harbour Trail is a walking tour that passes by 70 significant historical spots including 10 national historical landmarks and 10 buildings listed on the National Register of Historical Buildings.

Pumpkin Pie Bars

  • Servings: 24 bars
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For crust:

  • 1/2 cup old fashioned oats
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened to room temperature

For filling:

  • 15 oz. can pumpkin filling
  • 12 oz. can evaporated milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

For topping:

  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup pecans, chopped

Instructions

To make crust: In the bowl of the electric mixer, combine oats, flour, brown sugar and butter. Mix on low with the paddle attachment until just combined. The mixture will look crumbly. Press into the bottom of a 9 X 13 pan. Bake for 15 minutes at 350 degrees.

To make filling: While crust is baking, combine pumpkin filling, evaporated milk, eggs, sugar, spices and salt. Mix on low until smooth. When crust is done, pour mixture over it and then return pan to oven for 20 minutes.

To make topping: While filling bakes, combine brown sugar and chopped pecans in a small bowl. When filling has baked approximately 20 minutes, remove from oven. Sprinkle topping over the filling which will be wiggly and not yet set. Return pan to oven for an additional 20 minutes or until top is golden brown.

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Wicked Good Licks: Grape-Nuts Ice Cream – New Hampshire

Ahhhh, summertime and who can resist the sweet temptation of an ice cream cone? A regional flavor that doesn’t get much national play is Grape-Nuts Ice Cream.The Granite State loves its dairy (it’s their top agricultural product) and this winning taste sensation can be found along the New Hampshire Ice Cream Trail and throughout New England.

Grape-Nuts Ice Cream - New Hampshire

The texture of the cereal reminded us of crushed cookies (and who doesn’t like that mix-in?) and its delicate nut-like flavor wedded well with the creamy vanilla base. Give it a try and you’ll be a convert too.

Hike, rock climb, or mountain bike in New Hampshire’s playground, the White Mountains.

Grape-Nuts Ice Cream

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • 3/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup Grape-Nuts cereal

Instructions

Heat the cream in a medium sized saucepan until bubbles appear on the edge of the pan. Remove from heat and add the sugar, stirring until completely dissolved. Add the vanilla. Cover and refrigerate for 2 to 24 hours. Pour cold batter into the canister of ice cream maker. Churn ice cream for 20 to 40 minutes or until it reaches soft serve consistency. Add Grape-Nuts cereal and let ice cream maker churn until cereal is fully incorporated. Remove ice cream to a freezer-safe container and let freeze until it reaches desired consistency.

Chow Down on Chowdah: New England Clam Chowder – New Hampshire

After a brisk day of hiking in New Hampshire’s White Mountains, nothing could be more inviting than a nice, hot bowl of clam

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chowdah. You can find good clam chowder at any clam shanty up and down the Eastern Seaboard, but New Hampshire has an especially strong connection to the rich, creamy soup because it’s one of the first places in the New World to have successfully cultivated potatoes, according to the National Potato Council. In the recipe we’re featuring, we used fresh clams, and it absolutely makes a difference in bringing out a bright, briny clam flavor. If you’ve never steamed clams before, don’t worry – it’s easy. Soak the clams so they filter out the excess salt and sand, then brush them well; then in a large pot bring a few cups of water to a boil along with onion and celery trimmings. Add the clams, cover and let steam until these babies open. You don’t want to overcook them; they’ll cook a little longer in the soup. Use red potatoes which are waxier and hold their shape better than the white variety. The rest is super easy: If you can fry bacon, you can manage. As they say in Manchester, mmm, mmm, wicked good!

Support local artisans and crafters at the Downtown Holiday Market in Manchester, December 11, 13 and 18, 2014.

New England Clam Chowder

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 3 to 4 pounds littleneck clams (yields approx. 1 cup of clam meat = approx. 30 clams)
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1/3 pound bacon
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 3/4 cup reserved clam cooking liquid
  • 1 cup bottled clam juice
  • 1 3/4 cup water
  • 6 to 8 small red potatoes, diced medium
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream

Instructions

To steam clams: Pick through clams and discard any with cracked or damaged shells. Soak for 20 minutes in fresh water. Lift them out of the water bath (do not strain) and brush them vigorously to get rid of any excess sand. Heat 3 to 4 cups of water in a large pot with onion and celery trimmings until slowly boiling. Turn down heat to medium. Add clams and cover. Steam about 4 to 6 minutes or until the shells start to open. Remove from heat and let cool. Discard any clams that do not open. Once shells are cool enough to handle, open shells, extract and chop meat coarsely. Reserve the cooking liquid.

To finish chowder: Fry bacon until it’s crisp. Remove bacon, add onion and celery. Cook until onion is translucent. When bacon is cool enough to handle, chop and return to pot. Add flour and cook, stirring constantly, 2 to 3 minutes. Add ¾ cup of the reserved clam cooking liquid (skimming off the top to avoid sand from the bottom of the pot), bottled clam juice, water and potatoes. Add salt, pepper and thyme. Bring to boil, then reduce to medium. Add chopped clams and simmer until potatoes are tender, approximately 25 minutes. Finish with cream, adjusting seasonings to taste.