Category Archives: Seafood

Crab Salad – Maryland

When you think of Maryland, you probably think of the Chesapeake Bay and if you think of the Chesapeake Bay, you probably think of blue crabs. The bay is an estuary (where saltwater and freshwater

Crab Salad - Maryland

mix) and the perfect environment for blue crab. In fact, the Chesapeake Bay produces 50 percent of the blue crab harvest in the United States.

If it’s hot where you are, you might welcome this no-cook crab salad recipe that does not involve an oven. We served this on endive boats for a lovely appetizer pre-concert, but you could put it on crackers or even a soft roll for a crab salad sammie.

Check out the wild horses on Assateague Island National Seashore, near Ocean City, where you can swim, hike the beach, kayak, fish or birdwatch.

Crab Salad

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Time: 10 min.
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 rib celery, chopped
  • 1 scallion, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon grainy mustard
  • 2-3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 8 oz. fresh crab meat
  • Old Bay seasoning, to taste

Instructions

In a medium bowl, add celery, scallion, mustard and mayo. Mix until well combined. Gently fold in crab meat, taking care not to break up large lumps or claw meat. Add Old Bay seasoning to taste. Let chill before serving.

Smoked Salmon Dip – Alaska

 We’ve talked before about Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, a.k.a. King Salmon, a.k.a Chinook salmon, the state fish of Alaska. Salmon is loaded with omega-3 fatty acids which may aid in heart health,

Smoked Salmon Dip - Alaska

 

reduce inflammation and reduce the risk of stroke.

We especially love the flavor of smoked salmon. We’ve been buying Costco’s Alaskan version for several years now (they also carry Norwegian smoked salmon). Wild caught, it contains no artificial colors or preservatives. We took a few liberties with Ina Garten’s

Smoked salmon dip Smoked Salmon Dip. Double this recipe if you’re having a party, otherwise, it’s the perfect amount for a pre-dinner nibble with some raw veggies and crackers.

Rising over 20,000 feet, Denali is North America’s tallest mountain. Sitting amid 9,400 square miles of parkland, this jewel in the national park system is bigger than the state of New Hampshire and contains only one road.

Smoked Salmon Dip

  • Servings: 10
  • Time: 15 min.
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon horseradish
  • 2 ounces smoked salmon, diced
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Instructions

 In a medium bowl with a hand mixer, mix cream cheese with yogurt until smooth. Add lemon juice and horseradish. Mix again. With a wooden spoon, add salmon and mix until incorporated. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve chilled with crudité and crackers.

Deviled Eggs with Crab – Delaware

We here in the StateEats Kitchen love our party foods. Whether it’s flatbread, chicken wings, potato skins or even toasted ravioli, we’ve

Deviled Eggs with Crab - Delaware

always said we could eat an entire meal of just appetizers. Lucky for us, the big game is this weekend where we intend to do just that.

Deviled eggs are a standard at football parties across the country but deviled eggs with crab? Oh, that brings it up to a whole new level. This is a more decadent deviled egg with a nod to the First State’s most cherished product that brought in a dockside value of $3.76 million in 2014. We used sriracha mustard to amp up the spice but if you can’t find it, just use equal parts Dijon and sriracha sauce, or skip the sriracha altogether if you don’t want the heat.

Check out the Johnson Victrola Museum in Dover. This small but quirky museum is named for Delaware native Eldridge Reeves Johnson, who founded the Victor Talking Machine Company.

Deviled Eggs with Crab

  • Servings: 6-12
  • Time: 20 min.
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 6 hard boiled eggs
  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon Sriracha mustard
  • 1 tablespoon dill pickle relish
  • 1 tablespoon chives, chopped
  • 4 ounces lump crabmeat
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Old Bay seasoning (for topping)
  • Chive tops (for topping, optional)

Instructions

Slice eggs in half lengthwise. Scoop out egg yolks and place in small mixing bowl. Add mayo, mustard, relish and chives. Mix well. Gently add in lump crabmeat and stir just until incorporated. Add salt and pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture back into the egg whites. Top with Old Bay seasoning and chive tops if using.

Smoked Salmon and Potato Salad Wraps – Alaska

As mentioned last week, we recently spent a fabulous two weeks in Scandinavia. We ate our way through Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Boy, did we eat.

The Danish enjoy their smørrebrød, which are open faced sandwiches,  usually on buttered rye bread or a hearty brown bread.

Smørrebrød from Denmark
Smørrebrød from Denmark

As you can see, the Danish have elevated the presentation so that this becomes so much more than just a boring old sandwich.

The Swedish love their lingonberries. We of course had to have meatballs with lingonberries, a very traditional dish. We loved the

Swedish Meatballs with Lingonberries
Swedish Meatballs with Lingonberries

contrast between the creamy sauce on the meatballs and the tart zing of the lingonberries, which taste similar to cranberries. We’ve also talked before about Norwegian lefse, a soft potato crepe, and we saw that on many menus.

But one item that all of these countries had in common was their love for smoked salmon. We saw it on breakfast buffets, on smørrebrød at lunch, and even on dinner menus, like in this wrap.

Smoked salmon and potato salad wrap

We first encountered this simple yet delicious combination on a train of all places, and knew we had to recreate it with Alaskan smoked salmon. Salmon is a good-for-you protein, loaded with omega-3 fatty acids which may aid in heart health, reduce inflammation and reduce the risk of stroke. Look for wild caught salmon rather than farm raised salmon which may contain contaminants.

Mendenhall Glacier is less than 30 minutes away from Juneau, Alaska. This very accessible glacier is 12 miles long, boasts six hiking trails and is part of Tongass National Forest.

Smoked Salmon and Potato Salad Wraps

  • Servings: 1
  • Time: 5 min.
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 2-3 ounces smoked salmon
  • 1/3 cup potato salad
  • 1/2 cup arugula
  • 1/4 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1/4 cup diced red pepper (optional)
  • 1 spinach wrap or flour tortilla

Instructions

In the middle of a wrap or tortilla, spread salmon lengthwise, then add potato salad, arugula, cherry tomatoes and diced pepper (if using). Fold in ends, then roll up the wrap. Slice on the diagonal.

True Grit: Shrimp and Grits – North Carolina

Grits are about as synonymous with the South as sweet tea and pulled pork barbeque. For those unfamiliar, grits are made with stone-ground cornmeal. Think of them as the southern version of polenta.

Shrimp and grits North Carolina

 

Grits are a carb that can be dressed up sweet — with a little pat of butter and maple syrup — or like in this recipe, savory — with cheese. The quintessential pairing of shrimp and grits is one that you will find in kitchens from Wilmington to Charlotte with tons of variations in between. We like this version, which is slightly adapted from Saveur. Just don’t use instant grits which are gluey and bland. To quote the 1992 film classic My Cousin Vinny, “no self-respectin’ Southerner uses instant grits.”

Wilmington is home to the annual North Carolina Azalea Festival, April 6-10, 2016. Celebrate spring with arts and crafts shows, entertainment, kids’ activities, a street fair and live music.

Shrimp and Grits

  • Servings: 4
  • Time: 1 hour
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 4 cups water
  • 1 cup white stone ground grits
  • 3/4 cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 4 slices of bacon
  • 1 lb. medium peeled shrimp (about 30)
  • 6 white mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon hot sauce
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Instructions

In a medium saucepan, bring 4 cups of water to boil. Reduce heat to low and stir in grits. Cook on low, whisking frequently, until grits are cooked through and are tender and creamy, about 30-40 minutes. Add cheeses and 1 tablespoon butter. Salt to taste. Set aside.

Cook bacon in a medium skillet until browned and crisp. Remove to paper towel. Set aside. Reserve the bacon fat.

Season the shrimp with salt and pepper. Using the same pan over medium-high heat, cook the shrimp until pink and no longer opaque. Transfer shrimp to a plate. Lower heat to medium. Add mushrooms and cook until browned. Add garlic and cook until golden, about 1 minute. Return heat to high, add broth. Scrape browned bits from pan and then let liquid reduce by about half. Return shrimp to pan, then add lemon juice, remaining 1 tablespoon of butter, and hot sauce. Cook until sauce thickens, stirring constantly. Season again with salt and pepper if necessary.

To serve, divide grits into 4 portions. Add shrimp and sauce. Top with bacon and scallions.

Ooooh La La: Lobster Stuffed Mushrooms – Maine

Lobster is not the official state food of Maine, but it should be, with the love of the crustacean evident from lobster shacks that dot the coastline from Portland to Bar Harbor.  We’ve talked before about

Lobster Stuffed Mushrooms - Maine

how lobster is a major component of the Pine Tree state’s economy with 121 million pounds landed in 2015 with a value of over $495 million, according to the state’s Department of Marine Resources.

So rich and delicious, lobster is a once-in-a while pricy indulgence that usually marks special occasions. However, if you want to fancify your next dinner or cocktail party without shelling out the major bucks, this recipe is perfect. One cup of lobster meat goes a long way with these stuffed mushrooms. Since it’s chopped finely, you can opt for the claws rather than the more expensive tail meat and no one will be the wiser.

The Maine Science Festival takes place March 18-20, 2016, in Bangor. Enjoy free lectures, demonstrations and exhibits on everything from brain anatomy to aquaculture.

Lobster Stuffed Mushrooms

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Time: 35 minutes
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 shallot, chopped
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 12 large mushrooms
  • 1 cup cooked lobster (about 1/2 lb.)
  • ¼ teaspoon dried oregano
  • ¼ cup seasoned breadcrumbs
  • ¼ cup grated parmesan cheese
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Sharp cheddar cheese
  • Parsley, chopped (optional)

Instructions

In a small sauté pan, add olive oil and heat on medium-high. Add chopped shallot and garlic and sauté until shallot becomes translucent. While the shallot and garlic is cooking, gently wipe the mushrooms with a damp paper towel. Remove the stems and set on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray.

In a medium bowl, add cooked lobster, cooked shallot and garlic, oregano, breadcrumbs, and parmesan. Mix well and then season with salt and pepper. Stuff each of the mushrooms with the breadcrumb lobster mixture. Bake for 10 minutes at 375 degrees. Add small slice of cheddar cheese on top of each mushroom and parsley if using. Bake five more minutes or until cheese on top is melted and bubbling.

 

 

Laissez Les Bon Temps Rouler: Chicken, Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya – Louisiana

Next week is Mardi Gras (February 9, 2016) so the folks down in New Orleans have been celebrating a while now with parties, parades and all manner of revelry.  Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday) celebrations have actually been around for thousands of years as

Chicken, Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya

festivals of spring and fertility but when Christianity was established, the holiday became associated with the last day of merry making and eating rich food before Lent.

Many dishes are associated with Mardi Gras including crawfish etouffee, gumbo and this jambalaya, a rice based dish that is great for serving a crowd.

If you wondered about the difference between Creole versus Cajun food, one basic difference is that Creole food uses tomatoes while Cajun food generally does not. Since we opted out of tomatoes with this dish, I guess we made Cajun jambalaya but you can use tomatoes if you want to make it Creole. Just add them when the other vegetables go in.

The protein in jambalaya can vary but we went with the very traditional chicken, shrimp and sausage. Feel free to modify based on your tastes.

Mardi Gras will be reaching a full fledged fervor this weekend with parades from the so-called “super krewes” of Orpheus, Bacchus and Endymion which feature the most massive and detailed floats. Check out www.mardigrasneworleans.com for a full schedule.

Chicken, Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Time: 90 min.
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil
  • 3-4 pounds chicken thighs
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 1 rib celery, chopped
  • 1 large green pepper, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, diced
  • 3 tablespoons parsley, minced
  • 1 pound raw shrimp
  • 6 smoked sausages (Andouille or Polish)
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 ½ cups long grain white rice
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 cup water

 Instructions

In a large, heavy pot, heat the oil on medium heat until hot. Cook the chicken pieces with the skin on until golden brown on both sides. Remove chicken and set aside. Add the shrimp and sauté  2 minutes each side. Remove shrimp and set aside. Add all the vegetables into the pot and cook on medium until the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the sausage and seasonings and cook until the sausage is browned. Add the chicken, broth and water. Stir gently, making sure chicken is submerged. Raise the heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce to low, then cover the pot. Simmer for 35 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and bring heat to medium for 10 minutes or until liquid is almost absorbed. During the last 10 minutes, remove chicken. When it is cool enough to handle, remove meat, discard skin and bones and add shredded meat back into jambalaya. Add the shrimp and cook until heated through.

Feeling Crabby: Crab Crostini Melts – Delaware

Delaware is the second smallest state, and while only 30 miles wide, it also has 117 miles of coastline. Beaches and the shore make up a big part of the state’s culture and we’ve talked before about how the blue crab is a vital part of the state’s economy.

Crab Crostini Melts - Delaware

We created this this lovely little appetizer for a recent pool party and it was a big hit. You can spend a lot of money on crab meat but since this is basically gussied up crab salad topped with tomatoes and Parmesan cheese, save your money for good cocktails.

If bird watching is your thing, check out Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Dover, with its stellar interpretive programs and photography opportunities.

 

Crab Crostini Melts

  • Servings: 8-12
  • Time: 20 min.
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 12 ounces crabmeat
  • 3 heaping tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons red onion, diced
  • 2 tablespoons red pepper, diced
  • 3/4 teaspoon lemon zest
  • Pepper
  • Roma tomatoes, thinly sliced and cut in half
  • Parmesan cheese, grated
  • Paprika
  • Small baguette, sliced

Instructions

Preheat broiler. Slice the baguette and place pieces on a baking tray. Broil both sides, about 2 to 3 minutes or until golden brown. Combine first five ingredients. Season with pepper. Add crab mixture onto crostini. Top with a half tomato slice and then Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on paprika. Broil again until cheese is melted, about 3 minutes.

Clamoring for More:- New Haven White Clam Pizza – Connecticut

The Nutmeg State’s second largest city, New Haven, is identified with the white clam pizza.  If you’ve never tasted the savory sensation that is white clam pizza, well then friends, you’ve been missing out. Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana on Wooster Street claims

New Haven White Clam Pizza

to be the originator of this dish which dates back to the 1960s when the restaurant served little neck clams as an appetizer.  Presumably, Frank didn’t think it much of a stretch to toss some clams and parmesan cheese on top of dough and call it “apizza” (ah-beets as the locals still say).

A couple of tips about white clam pizza: We don’t recommend using canned clams. They will be way too chewy. Frozen will work in a pinch but your best bet, as usual, is freshly steamed. We’ve told you before here and here how to steam clams. It really is easy so don’t be intimidated.  Also, please note that the recipe below makes enough dough for two pizzas but the amount of clams and cheese is for only one pizza. Just double the amounts if you want to make two pizzas.

If you dig all things nautical, check out Mystic Seaport, the nation’s leading maritime museum with four national historic landmark vessels including the 1841 whaleship, the Charles W. Morgan, the country’s oldest commercial ship still in existence.

New Haven White Clam Pizza

  • Servings: 4
  • Time: 1 hour, 30 min.
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For crust (will make enough for two crusts):

  • I package yeast
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 ½ cups warm water
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 1/2 – 4 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Cooking spray

For pizza (double these amounts if you will be making two pizzas):

  • 25-30 little neck clams
  • 1 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon oregano
  • 1 tablespoon parsley, finely minced
  • Olive oil

Instructions

To make crust: In a large bowl, dissolve yeast and 1 teaspoon sugar in ½ cup warm water. Let sit until mixture begins to foam. Add rest of water and olive oil.  Add 3 ½ cups flour, salt, and remaining sugar. Mix with a stand mixer fitted with dough hooks until well combined. If dough is too sticky add a quarter cup of flour at a time, until dough is smooth and elastic and pulls away from the bowl. Transfer dough to a large bowl that has been coated with cooking spray. Cover with a tea towel and let rise, about 40-55 minutes. Divide into two. Set aside one crust for a different kind of pizza or wrap in plastic wrap and freeze.

To steam clams: Pick through clams and discard any with cracked or damaged shells. Soak for 20 minutes in fresh water. Lift them out of the water bath (do not strain) and brush them vigorously to get rid of any excess sand. Heat 3 to 4 cups of water in a large pot. Turn down heat to medium. Add clams and cover. Steam about 4 to 6 minutes or until the shells just start to open. Do not overcook as clams will cook again on the pizza. Remove from heat and let cool. Discard any clams that do not open. Once shells are cool enough to handle, open shells, extract and chop meat coarsely.

To make pizza:  Preheat oven to 550 degrees with pizza stone inside if using. Place the ball of dough down on a well-floured work surface. Using the heel of your hand, press down to flatten. Lift the dough onto a round pan or pizza paddle sprinkled with corn meal. Continuing pressing and shaping the dough.  If dough is too springy, let rest about 10 minutes until the gluten relaxes, then proceed. Once dough is the appropriate size, press and shape a ½ inch crust on the edge. Brush dough with olive oil. Add Parmesan cheese, oregano, garlic and then clams. If using a pizza paddle, transfer pizza onto baking stone that has been preheating in oven. Bake at 550 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes or until the dough is browned and the cheese is golden. Finish with additional olive oil if desired.

Feast Away on Crawfish Etouffee – Louisiana

Yes, it’s true. At least one state has an official state crustacean. The Louisiana legislature bestowed this honor to the crawfish in 1983. Crawfish — also called mudbugs, crayfish or crawdads — look like

Crawfish Etouffee - Louisiana

mini lobsters but are the freshwater version. While crawfish are caught in the wild – with a season that runs from roughly December through June – Louisiana also has an established farming industry that provides more than 90 percent of the domestic supply.

If you’ve ever dined on crawfish, you know that its delicate, lobster-like tail meat is perfect in soups, stews, dips and the etouffee (French for “smothered”) recipe you see below. Keep in mind that if you’re buying whole crawfish rather than just the tails, your yield of meat is about 15 percent. Meaning, you’ll have to buy about 6 pounds to get 1 pound of meat. If you can’t find crawfish, you can substitute shrimp or even crab, and if you like it spicy, just up the amount of cayenne.

The Louisiana Crawfish Festival takes place March 26-29, 2015, in Chalmette.

Crawfish Etouffee

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Time: 40 minutes
  • Difficulty: easy
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Recipe courtesy of www.cajundaughters.com, used with permission.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound peeled crawfish tails
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped fine
  • 1 large onion, chopped fine
  • 1/2 small bell pepper, chopped fine
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons chopped green onion tops
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 cup water

Instructions

Season tails with salt and pepper and set aside. Make roux with butter and flour, cook over medium heat until light brown. Add celery, onion, bell pepper and garlic. Cook until the onion becomes translucent. Add tails and sauté about 20 minutes. Add water and green onions and bring to a boil. Cook over low heat about 5 minutes. Add parsley and cook 5 more minutes. Season to taste. Serve over hot rice.