Category Archives: Virginia

Peanut Soup – Virginia (V, GF)

We admit to loving anything with peanuts. And why not? Peanuts are a good source of protein and contain vitamins and minerals such as magnesium, potassium and Vitamin E.  Virginia peanuts are

Peanut Soup - Virginia

mostly grown in southeastern Virginia but also in the Carolinas. Virginia peanuts are prized because they are bigger than other types such as Spanish, Runner, and Valencia.

Most peanut soup recipes use peanut butter and add cream — not an option if one is vegan or lactose intolerant. But then we found this recipe from the Washington Post where the peanuts are soaked overnight. It was like the answer to all of our soup prayers. This earthy soup is perfect for these chilly fall evenings or football Sundays.

Great Falls National Park is just 15 miles from Washington, DC and boasts spectacular views of the waterfalls with three overlooks. Activities include biking, boating, hiking, and fishing.

Peanut Soup

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Time: 45 min.
  • Difficulty: easy
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Recipe credit: Washington Post

Ingredients

  • 2 cups roasted, unsalted peanuts, covered with water and soaked overnight
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 2 ribs celery, diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 6 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/4 cup apple, diced (for garnish)
  • Dash of hot sauce (optional)

Instructions

Drain soaked peanuts, set aside. Place oil into large soup pot and heat over medium heat. Add onion and celery. Cook until onions are translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the drained peanuts. Add celery seed and bay leaf, cook on medium for about 2 minutes. Add broth. Turn heat to medium-high and cook until the soup begins to boil. Reduce to low and continue cooking about 25 minutes or until peanuts are quite soft. Remove bay leaf and let soup cool a bit.

With an immersion or stand blender, blend soup in small batches until desired consistency is reached. Return soup to the pot and add salt, pepper and lemon juice to taste. Heat through. Garnish with diced apple and hot sauce if desired.

Bar Food is for Lovers: Sweet and Savory Peanuts – Virginia (vegan)

We don’t know about you, but when we think of the foods of Virginia, two things come to mind: Smithfield ham (which is a type of country ham protected by state law and only produced in the town

Sweet and Savory Peanuts - Virginiaof Smithfield) and peanuts. There are actually thousands of peanut cultivars but the four main groups grown in the U.S. include Spanish, Runner, Valencia and Virginia. Virginia peanuts are mostly grown in southeastern Virginia but also in the Carolinas. Virginia peanuts are prized because they are bigger than the other types.

For those who love sweet and salty snacks to go with a beer or cocktail, this recipe will deliver. Just try to keep yourself from eating too many at once, we found them totally addictive. You’ve been warned.

Enjoy the wildflowers on the historic Skyline Drive which covers 105 miles through Shenandoah National Park. Be sure to allow enough time for checking out the visitor center, hiking, exploring neighboring towns, and of course, eating.

Sweet and Savory Peanuts

  • Servings: 10
  • Time: 25 minutes
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon agave syrup
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (up to ¼ teaspoon if you like spicy)
  • 1 ½ cups lightly salted Virginia peanuts
  • 2 tablespoons sugar

Instructions

In a large bowl, place agave syrup and spices (everything except the sugar). Stir until well blended. Add peanuts and stir to coat. Spread peanut mixture evenly on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and bake at 350 degrees, stirring every five minutes for 20 minutes or until nuts are caramel brown. Remove from oven and sprinkle on sugar, then toss with spatula until nuts are fully coated. Let cool. Break up into smaller pieces and store in an airtight container.

Whose Stew is it Anyway? Brunswick Stew – Virginia

Virginia is for lovers and we’re feeling the culinary love for Brunswick Stew.

Brunswick Stew - Virginia

 

Legend has it that Jimmy Matthews, a camp cook, created this stew for a hunting party back in 1828 on the banks of the Nottoway River. Other places have claimed Brunswick Stew as their own, most notably Brunswick, Georgia, spawning some serious stew wars. Georgia versions tend to have beef or pork as the protein while the Virginia version uses chicken. Thankfully for us, neither uses squirrel, the primary protein when the dish was created in the nineteenth century. This stew is hearty thanks to the addition of corn, potatoes and butterbeans, and the Brunswick Stewmaster’s Association asserts that it isn’t done until the spoon can stand up in the middle of the stew pot.

Brunswick Stew - Virginia

Head out to the Taste of Brunswick Festival in Alberta, Virginia, October 11, 2014, where you can sample lots of versions during the stew cook off.

Brunswick Stew

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Time: 1 hour, 30 min.
  • Difficulty: easy
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Recipe adapted from Brunswick Stewmaster’s Association, used with permission.

Ingredients

  • 6 bone-in chicken thighs, skin removed
  • 1 carrot, cut into large pieces
  • 1 stalk celery, cut into large pieces
  • 1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup chopped yellow onions
  • 3 medium potatoes, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 1 can (28 oz.) crushed tomatoes
  • 2 cans (15 oz.) small butterbeans or lima beans, drained
  • 2 cans (7 oz.) white shoe peg corn, drained
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Vegetable oil

 Instructions

In a large pot, place chicken with enough water to cover it. Add carrot, celery peppercorns and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, then simmer until meat falls off bone, about 45 minutes. Remove chicken but reserve stock. Shred meat. In a separate pot, sauté the chopped onion in vegetable oil until translucent. Add meat, potatoes, tomatoes and salt and peppers, plus some of the stock to desired consistency. Simmer slowly, stirring often to prevent sticking, until potatoes are tender, approximately 30 minutes. Add additional stock if stew becomes too thick. Add butterbeans and corn, heat an additional 10 to15 minutes or until beans and corn are heated through. Season again with salt and peppers before serving.