Tag Archives: beef

Five-Way Any Day: Cincinnati Chili – Ohio

If you are a Buckeye, then you know Skyline Chili, the ubiquitous Cincinnati chain that began in 1949. Legend has it that the business got its name from the city view of the chili parlor’s original Glenway Avenue location. What makes Cincy chili unique is its distinctive

Cincinnati Chili

spices including cinnamon, allspice and cocoa powder, reminiscent of the Greek dish moussaka, not surprising given that the chain was founded by Nicholas Lambrinides, a Greek immigrant. Just as unique is that the chili is almost always served on a bed of spaghetti and fans know just how to order: either 3-way (chili with spaghetti and cheese); 4-way (chili with spaghetti and cheese and either onions or beans) or 5-way (chili with spaghetti, cheese, onions and beans). We’re a fan of the 5-way ourselves, but the beauty of Cincy Chili is that is entirely customizable. Put out bowls of cheese, onion and beans and let everyone help themselves.

If Queen City is your destination, don’t miss Findlay Market. On the National Register of Historic Places, the state’s oldest continuously operated market offers meat, fish, poultry, produce, cheese, and lots of dining options. In the summer months the market hosts a biergarten with live entertainment.

Cincinnati Chili

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Recipe courtesy of Jessica Hudacek Ried

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 3 cups onion, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 3 pounds lamb, ground beef or ground turkey
  • 2 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon allspice
  • 1 ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 4 2/3 cup beef broth
  • 1/3 cup tomato paste
  • 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 ½ tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • 2 15 oz. cans kidney beans, drained
  • Spaghetti
  • Chopped onion
  • Cheddar cheese

Instructions

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add onions and sauté until soft. Add meat, cooking until no longer pink. Add cocoa, allspice, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, and cumin. Stir in broth and then tomato paste, vinegar, chili powder, brown sugar, and Worcestershire sauce. Bring to boil, then reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer uncovered until thickened, about 1 hour. Season with salt and pepper. Heat beans separately, tossed with 2 tablespoons oil and seasoned with salt and pepper.

To serve, ladle chili over spaghetti. Top with beans, cheese, and onions or any combination thereof.

Advertisements

Gimme Chimi: Beef Chimichangas – Arizona

The origins of the chimichanga are murky at best. Two restaurants in the Grand Canyon State stake a claim: Macayo’s Mexican Kitchen, a

Beef Chimichangas - AZ

Phoenix chain, asserts that the dish was created there in 1946. Tucson’s El Charro Café also says that the dish was the happy accident of a burrito being knocked into the deep fat fryer in the early 1950s. The cook started to swear in Spanish, but seeing children, quickly changed her profane utterance to the word “chimichanga” which loosely translates as “thingamajig.”

In 2011, Macayo’s started a petition drive to have the chimichanga recognized by the Arizona legislature as the official state dish. Alas, that effort was not successful, so poor Arizona must muddle along without a signature dish to call its own. That’s OK, because StateEats is officially declaring our allegiance to chimis and all its variations, from pork to chicken to vegetarian. For this recipe, we went with the very traditional beef. We also tested both the deep frying and baking methods. Although purists may scoff, we actually preferred the baked version which is less heavy. Save your calories for a margarita (prickly pear!) and chips and guac.

You still have time to check out the Arizona State Fair which runs Wednesday through Sunday until November 6, 2015, in Phoenix.

Beef Chimichangas

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • Small white onion, chopped
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced (optional)
  • 4 oz. can chopped green chilies
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 6 flour tortillas
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 cup Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
  • Salsa (optional)
  • Guacamole (optional)
  • Sour cream (optional)
  • Cilantro, chopped (optional)

Instructions

In a large skillet over medium heat, brown the beef until it is no longer pink. Drain the fat. Add onions, garlic and jalapeno (if using). Cook until onion is translucent and pepper is soft. Add green chilies, chili powder, and cumin. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Soften tortillas one at a time by heating them in the microwave for 10 to 15 seconds. Add approximately one third of a cup of filling just off center of the tortilla. Fold up bottom edge closest to you, then sides, then roll up tortilla the rest of the way. Secure with a toothpick. Repeat with remaining tortillas. Place into a shallow pan, seam side down. Brush with melted butter. Bake at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until tortillas just begin to brown. Remove from oven, top with shredded cheese and return to oven for 5 minutes or until cheese is melted. Serve with salsa, guacamole and/or sour cream and top with chopped cilantro if desired.

 

 

 

 

Lovey Dovey Loosey Goosey: Loose Meat Sandwich – Iowa

A loose meat sandwich is a declaration in simplicity. Not gussied up with tons of toppings, not loaded with cheese, the loose meat sandwich is not a sloppy joe or a burger, but something in between.

Loose Meat Sandwich - Iowa

Sometimes called a tavern sandwich, the beef is lightly seasoned and usually adorned with ketchup, mustard, raw onion, and pickle rounds. Made famous by the Midwest chain Maid-Rite, this ode to beef has been sustaining Iowans, where most of the stores are located, since the 1920s.

If don’t live in the Midwest, you can easily make this sandwich at home. You’ll find tons of variations on this recipe, with lots of different ingredients — some even include cola as a sweetener — but we liked this one for its straightforwardness with ingredients you probably already have on hand.

If you’ve never checked out the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines, you’ve been missing out. From its iconic gold dome, to the glass floor in the rotunda, the building is simply stunning and well worth a tour.

Loose Meat Sandwiches

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients
• 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
• 1 large onion, chopped finely (reserve approx. 2 tablespoons raw)
• 1 pound ground beef (or turkey)
• 1 tablespoon yellow mustard
• 1 tablespoon white vinegar
• 1 ½ tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
• 1 14.5 oz. can of beef broth
• 2 teaspoons brown sugar
• 4 sesame seed hamburger buns
• Salt
• Pepper
• Dill pickles, sliced

Instructions
Heat the vegetable oil on medium heat in a large saute pan. Add onions, sauting until translucent. Add beef and cook until meat is no longer pink. Use a potato masher to break up the larger chunks of beef. Add the mustard, vinegar and Worcestershire sauce, then add the beef broth and sugar. Continue cooking until broth is reduced. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve on buns, topped with ketchup and/or mustard, raw onions and pickle slices.

Big and Beefy: Texas Brisket

Although the state snack of Texas is chips and salsa, and the state dish is chili con carne, we decided we needed to highlight beef in a big Texas way. The Lone Star state is the top cattle producer in the country ― a $10.5 billion industry in 2012 — according to the Texas Department of Agriculture.

Texas Brisket

Barbeque can mean different things depending on where you eat in this country. In the southeast, barbeque usually means pig. But in Texas, when folks babble on about barbeque, they usually are talking about beef, and by beef, we mean brisket.

The key to a good brisket is picking a good cut of meat with a bit of marbling (choose choice or prime) and cooking it low and slow over a wood or charcoal fire. Is this method time consuming? Yes. It is worth every minute? Absolutely! We smoked ours over hickory chips and the resulting meat had a beautiful bark (that dark, crusty exterior) and a wonderful, smoky flavor. Some Texans scoff at using any type of BBQ sauce but we provided one for you here, just in case you like to embellish your meat.

If you’d like some homegrown Texas refreshment to wash down that BBQ, head to the Dr. Pepper Museum in Waco. Fun and kitschy!

Texas Brisket

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 3-4 lb. choice or prime beef brisket, trimmed
  • 4 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 4 tablespoons black pepper

For beef rub:

  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons dry mustard
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar

For BBQ sauce:

  • 1 cup chopped onions
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/3 cups beer
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon brown mustard
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Instructions

For meat: The night before, mix the 4 tablespoons salt and pepper together in a small bowl. Rub on the brisket. Loosely cover with foil and let sit overnight in fridge. Mix all ingredients for the rub in another bowl, set aside.

In the morning, preheat smoker. Remove meat from fridge and cover meat with a thin coating of vegetable oil. Cover with the rub. When the smoker reaches 225 degrees, place meat in smoker. Cooking time will depend on thickness of brisket, but a general rule is about 90 minutes for each pound. When brisket reaches 190-200 degrees, remove from smoker, wrap tightly in aluminum foil and place in a cooler lined with old towels. This will allow the brisket to stay hot until serving time.

For BBQ sauce: Heat vegetable oil in a medium saucepan. When hot, add chopped onion and garlic. Sauté until onion is translucent. Add beer, ketchup, brown sugar, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce and mustard. Stir until combined. Add chili powder and crushed red pepper. Bring to a boil. Let simmer for one hour until thickened. Allow to cool slightly. Place BBQ sauce in a food processor or blender. Blend until onions and garlic are incorporated into the sauce (if too thick, thin with a little bit of the leftover beer).

When ready to serve brisket, reheat BBQ sauce. Slice meat perpendicular to the grain and drizzle or dollop with sauce. Serve plain or on soft buns.

 

Cheese, Please! Philly Cheesesteaks – Pennsylvania

Philadelphia is known as the City of Brotherly Love, and serious lunch-love is what we feel when we partake of Pennsylvania’s official state sandwich, the Philly Cheesesteak. This pinnacle of cheesiness has actually been around since 1930 when Pat Olivieri Philly Cheesesteakcreated the sandwich at his hot dog stand in South Philly. If you’re from the Philadelphia area, you know that folks claim their allegiance to a particular cheesesteak joint with a feverish fervor. But you can easily make this delectable creation at home. The trick is slicing the beef super thin, which you can do if you freeze the meat ahead of time.

Continue reading Cheese, Please! Philly Cheesesteaks – Pennsylvania

Bierocks Rock – Nebraska

Americans love their hand-held meat pies. Michigan has the pasty, West Virginia has the pepperoni roll, and Nebraska has the bierock. (Let’s not even start with Central and South American empanadas or the Italian calzone). Just like pepperoni rolls, these savory buns were

Bierock (Nebraska) sign

probably brought to the U.S. by Europeans, specifically Eastern Europeans who immigrated to the Midwest and Plains states beginning at the turn of the century until after WWII. Many of these people were farmers, as they found the land to be similar to their homeland. Bierocks filled the farmers’ lunch pails – they were easy to eat on the go and were filling. Bierocks (pronounced “brook” or Continue reading Bierocks Rock – Nebraska