Tag Archives: bread

Fluffernutter – Massachusetts

October 8th is National Flutternutter Day. If you’ve never experienced the joy that is a flutternutter, let us indoctrinate you.

Marshmallow Fluff is actually celebrating its 100th birthday this year. Originally sold door to door in Somerville, Mass. by an

Fluffernutter - Massachusetts

enterprising fellow name Achibald Query, Boston candy company Durkee-Mower bought the recipe in 1917 for $500.

The sandwich dates back to WWI, when Snowflake Marshmallow Crème (an initial competitor of Durkee-Mower) began printing small brochures with the recipe, dubbing it a “Liberty Sandwich.” Durkee-Mower, however, really capitalized on the idea with a marketing campaign in the 1960s.

Catchy, right?? Even in black and white, this ad makes you want a fluffernutter RIGHT NOW. Luckily, this is a ridiculously easy sandwich to make and enjoy.

Quincy Market, which opened in 1826 in Boston, is a food-lovers mecca with over 50 restaurants and eateries, selling everything from lobster rolls to Boston cream pie.

Fluffernutter

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 2 slices, favorite soft bread
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 2 tablespoons Marshmallow Fluff

Instructions

Spread one piece of bread with peanut butter, the other with Marshmallow Fluff. Cement together and enjoy.

 

 

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Potato Bread – Idaho

Fall is finally upon us here in the Midwest. Hooray, time to fire up the oven and get to baking again. We’ve always loved the soft texture of potato bread that comes from the grocery store, so we

Potato Bread - Idaho

decided to try our hand at recreating it at home. Oh my, this was a winner! If you have leftover mashed potatoes, they will work just as well as freshly prepared, you’ll need about one cup. We tried rising this dough overnight in the fridge and it worked wonderfully. Keep this recipe in mind the next time you have overnight guests and want to have fresh bread in the morning.

Don’t feel bad about loving potatoes. Idaho surely doesn’t. The Gem State leads the states in potato production, with 13 billion pounds harvested in 2014. Potatoes are actually high in potassium and Vitamin C — providing almost half the recommended daily value.

Potato Bread - Idaho

Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve is located in Arco, Idaho and is an example of relatively recent volcanic activity. The preserve has three major lava fields, five lava tube caves and over 25 volcanic cones. Hiking, camping and cave exploring await.

Potato Bread

  • Servings: 2 loaves
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 1 medium Idaho baking potato
  • 1/2 cup reserved cooking liquid from making potato
  • 1 cup warm milk
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Crisco
  • 1 ½ tablespoons butter
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 package yeast
  • 1/3 cup warm water
  • 5 cups bread flour
  • Cooking spray

Instructions

Peel potato and cut into large pieces. Place into a medium pot of water and bring to a boil. When potato is soft, drain, reserving cooking liquid. Press cooked potato through a ricer. Add warm milk, ½ cup of reserved cooking liquid, Crisco, butter, salt and sugar. Set aside until cool.

In the stand mixer bowl, combine yeast and 1/3 cup warm water. Let stand a few minutes until mixture bubbles. Add the cooled potato mixture. Add flour. Mix with dough hook on slow speed, about 6 minutes. The dough will be very sticky. Transfer to a large bowl coated with cooking spray. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place for about 40 minutes (Alternatively, you can place in refrigerator and let rise overnight).

When ready to bake, punch dough down and knead 2 or 3 minutes. Divide dough in two equal parts and place in buttered rectangular bread pans. Let rise again for one hour or until doubled in size. Bake at 350 degrees for approximately 30 minutes or until golden brown.

Snick Snack: Zweiback – Kansas

Forget what you think you know about zwieback. This is decidedly not that hard toast stuff you give to babies when they are teething. When folks talk zweiback in the Sunflower State, they are referring to delicious rolls, a little bit richer and saltier than the usual Zweiback - Kansashomemade bun. The Mennonites brought these from Russia, presumably because they traveled well, especially when toasted (thus the name in German which roughly translates to “double baked”). These rolls have a unique shape with a little ball on top of the base of the bun. They are great for Sunday brunch with some butter and jam or to hold your sandwich innards. They also freeze very well.

History buffs will love Fort Larned National Historic Site, which houses a complete and authentic army post from the 1860s. Various living history events will take place Labor Day weekend, September 5-7, 2015, including lectures, carriage rides and artillery and  blacksmith demos.

Zweiback - Kansas

Zweiback

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 2 cups milk
  • 1/4 cup lukewarm water
  • 1/2 cup margarine, butter, or lard
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 5 3/4 to 6 cups flour

Instructions

Heat milk, water and butter or margarine together in a microwave safe bowl or cup until warm, about 100 degrees. Do not let the liquid boil as the yeast will not proof. Sprinkle with yeast and sugar. Let set a few minutes until mixture is bubbling.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the yeast mixture with salt. Gradually add 3 cups sifted flour and beat with an electric mixture for 5 minutes. Add the additional flour and beat until thoroughly combined. Turn out dough onto a well-floured surface and knead by hand for about 8-10 minutes or until dough is smooth and elastic. Place dough into a large bowl coated in oil and cover with a tea towel. Place in a warm spot for about 75 minutes or until dough is doubled in size. Punch down and let dough rise again, about 30-45 minutes. Punch down again. Remove dough to a well-floured surface and knead out any air bubbles.

To form the rolls, divide dough into 24 pieces. Roll each piece by hand until round, then pinch off a large marble sized piece. Place bigger piece on well-greased baking sheet, flatten slightly. In the middle of the roll, make an indentation, then place the smaller ball on top (this will ensure the top will not slide off during baking). Continue until all rolls are formed, making sure to spread out the rolls 2 inches apart. Bake at 375 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until rolls are golden brown.

Bierocks Rock – Nebraska

Americans love their hand-held meat pies. Michigan has the pasty, West Virginia has the pepperoni roll, and Nebraska has the bierock. (Let’s not even start with Central and South American empanadas or the Italian calzone). Just like pepperoni rolls, these savory buns were

Bierock (Nebraska) sign

probably brought to the U.S. by Europeans, specifically Eastern Europeans who immigrated to the Midwest and Plains states beginning at the turn of the century until after WWII. Many of these people were farmers, as they found the land to be similar to their homeland. Bierocks filled the farmers’ lunch pails – they were easy to eat on the go and were filling. Bierocks (pronounced “brook” or Continue reading Bierocks Rock – Nebraska

The Pompatus of Pepperoni – West Virginia

Pepperoni rolls are to West Virginia as lobster is to Maine. What!? You’ve never heard of pepperoni rolls? A pepperoni roll is delicious soft dough, formed into a little loaf, baked with pepperoni and a little cheese inside.

Pepperoni RollsImmigrant baker Giuseppe Argiro, who opened the Country Club Bakery in Fairmont, WV, may have been the first person to create the snack perhaps as early as 1927, although others claim it was not until the 1940s. The rolls were said to sustain the mostly-Italian coal miners who needed a portable, filling lunch to eat down in the mines. The Country Club Bakery is still in operation to this day and bakes between 250 and 900 rolls per day.

Continue reading The Pompatus of Pepperoni – West Virginia