Tag Archives: Chicken

Nashville Hot Chicken – Tennessee

Nashville is a fun town, boasting more than 160 live music venues, giving Music City its well-earned moniker. Hot chicken hails from these parts and was born from revenge. Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack

Nashville Hot Chicken - Tennesseemay be the oldest establishment to make this dish, dating back to the 1930s. The story is that Thorton Prince III was a womanizer. His girlfriend found out about his philandering and added spicy cayenne pepper to his chicken to punish him. However, Prince liked it so much, he decided to open a chicken joint with it on the menu.

You can make Nashville Hot Chicken yourself with a little bit of patience as fried chicken takes a bit of time. Two tablespoons of cayenne pepper is not a typo and is unbelievably the amount called for if you want the chicken “mild.” Reduce to one tablespoon if you are really spice-adverse and increase to 6 tablespoons for “hot” ― if you dare.

Want to see the recording studio where Elvis recorded more than 250 hits? Check out Historic RCA Studio B, an unassuming beige brick building sometimes called the “Home of a Thousand Hits.” Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton, Roy Orbison, Waylon Jennings, and many others recorded here.

Nashville Hot Chicken

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 1 3-4 lb. chicken, cut into 8 pieces
  • Salt
  • Pepper

For the egg dredge:

  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon Frank’s Red Hot sauce

For the flour dredge:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt

For finishing:

  • Vegetable oil (for frying), 6 cups
  • 2 tablespoons cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/2 cup used frying oil

Instructions

At least 3 hours before cooking, generously salt and pepper the chicken pieces. Let marinate in the refrigerator.

When ready to cook, heat oil in a large pot with deep sides. Prepare egg dredge by combining eggs, buttermilk and hot sauce in a shallow baking dish. In another shallow dish, prepare flour dredge by combining flour and salt. One at a time, dip chicken pieces first in egg dredge, then in flour dredge. When oil is 325 degrees, fry chicken, working in batches, frying a few pieces at a time. Turn pieces occasionally to achieve consistent color. When chicken is deep golden brown or reaches 160 degrees internally, remove to a wire rack set inside a baking sheet lined with newspaper or paper towels. Let oil temperature return to 325 between batches.

To finish: In a small bowl, combine cayenne, brown sugar, chili powder, paprika, garlic powder and salt and pepper. Take ½ cup of the used cooking oil, and add to bowl. Stir well. With a brush, baste pieces of chicken with hot oil mixture. Serve chicken while still warm.

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Thai Basil Chicken – Nevada

We read that there are 450 Thai restaurants in Las Vegas. While we couldn’t confirm that number, it does seem that every corner, block and strip mall has a Thai eatery, no doubt the result of a sizable

Thai Basil Chicken - Nevadapopulation of Thais who have immigrated to Clark County. If you are ever in Vegas, stand outs Lemongrass on the strip or Le Thai in downtown are worth the visit.

But if you can’t make it there, you can always try making Thai Basil Chicken. Basically a stir fry, this dish whips up very quickly as stir fries do. Try to find Thai holy basil which has a peppery kick, but if you can’t, regular basil will work. You can also omit the chili peppers if you don’t like heat.

One of the first reclamation projects along the Colorado River, the Hoover Dam is a sight to behold, supplying electricity to 100,000 households. Tours of the dam take place from 9:00 to 5:00 daily.

Thai Basil Chicken

  • Servings: 3-4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 small chili peppers (such as red fresno or jalapeno), deveined and deseeded and diced
  • 1 ½ pounds chicken breast, cubed
  • 2 tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 cup Thai holy basil (can sub other basil)
  • Olive oil

Instructions

In a wok or shallow sided pan, add a bit of olive oil and sauté garlic and chili peppers until fragrant, careful not to brown garlic. Add more oil, and then chicken. Sauté until chicken begins to brown. Add oyster sauce, soy sauce and sugar. Stir to combine (if mixture seems too dry, add additional oyster sauce and soy sauce by the teaspoon). Add basil and cook one minute longer, or until it begins to wilt. Serve with rice.

Chicken Vesuvio – Illinois

We’ve lived in the Chicago area for almost 20 years and have come across some delicious versions of Chicken Vesuvio. Harry Caray’s makes a mean version that they assert dates back to the 1920s, as does the venerable Gene & Georgetti. Although some people argue

Chicken Vesuvio

that Chicken Vesuvio has its roots in New York, New Jersey or even southern Italy, we are swayed by the claim that this dish was invented at Vesuvio Restaurant which was located on Wacker Drive in the 1930s. That, and the fact that we never heard of this dish until we moved here.

The components of Chicken Vesuvio are pretty straightforward. Bone-in chicken pieces are pan seared. Potatoes are added, usually with a generous amount of garlic. Oregano (or some other herb, sometimes rosemary) is sprinkled throughout the dish, and a white wine sauce melds all the flavors together. Sometimes additional vegetables are added, like mushroom (like we did) or artichokes. The dish is finished in the oven and peas are added at the last moment. Where ever it came from, no one can argue that this dish is delicious at every bite.

Hurry to get your tickets for Chicago Gourmet 2016, September 24-25, 2016. This premier food festival has an impressive array of celebrity chefs, cooking demonstrations and tastings.

Chicken Vesuvio

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

    • 1/2 cup olive oil, divided
    • 3 potatoes, quartered and then sliced 1/4 inch thick
    • 5-6 garlic cloves, minced
    • Salt
    • Pepper
    • 3 pounds chicken pieces, bone in
    • 8-10 baby portabella mushrooms, quartered
    • 3/4 cup white wine
    • 3/4 cup chicken stock
    • 2-3 teaspoons oregano
    • 1 cup frozen peas

Instructions

In a large, oven proof pan, heat ¼ cup of the cup of olive oil over medium heat. Add potatoes and garlic and cook until browned. Remove to a plate and set aside.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Season chicken pieces with salt and pepper. Add ¼ cup olive oil to pan. Working in batches if necessary, add chicken pieces. Cook skin side down until browned. Turn skin side up, then add mushrooms. Cook 3-4 minutes or until mushrooms are browned. Return potatoes to the pan. Add stock, wine and oregano. Cook until liquid is reduced by half.

Place pan in oven to finish, about 40 minutes. Add the frozen peas during the last five minutes of baking.

Laissez Les Bon Temps Rouler: Chicken, Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya – Louisiana

Next week is Mardi Gras (February 9, 2016) so the folks down in New Orleans have been celebrating a while now with parties, parades and all manner of revelry.  Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday) celebrations have actually been around for thousands of years as

Chicken, Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya

festivals of spring and fertility but when Christianity was established, the holiday became associated with the last day of merry making and eating rich food before Lent.

Many dishes are associated with Mardi Gras including crawfish etouffee, gumbo and this jambalaya, a rice based dish that is great for serving a crowd.

If you wondered about the difference between Creole versus Cajun food, one basic difference is that Creole food uses tomatoes while Cajun food generally does not. Since we opted out of tomatoes with this dish, I guess we made Cajun jambalaya but you can use tomatoes if you want to make it Creole. Just add them when the other vegetables go in.

The protein in jambalaya can vary but we went with the very traditional chicken, shrimp and sausage. Feel free to modify based on your tastes.

Mardi Gras will be reaching a full fledged fervor this weekend with parades from the so-called “super krewes” of Orpheus, Bacchus and Endymion which feature the most massive and detailed floats. Check out www.mardigrasneworleans.com for a full schedule.

Chicken, Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil
  • 3-4 pounds chicken thighs
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 1 rib celery, chopped
  • 1 large green pepper, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, diced
  • 3 tablespoons parsley, minced
  • 1 pound raw shrimp
  • 6 smoked sausages (Andouille or Polish)
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 ½ cups long grain white rice
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 cup water

 Instructions

In a large, heavy pot, heat the oil on medium heat until hot. Cook the chicken pieces with the skin on until golden brown on both sides. Remove chicken and set aside. Add the shrimp and sauté  2 minutes each side. Remove shrimp and set aside. Add all the vegetables into the pot and cook on medium until the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the sausage and seasonings and cook until the sausage is browned. Add the chicken, broth and water. Stir gently, making sure chicken is submerged. Raise the heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce to low, then cover the pot. Simmer for 35 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and bring heat to medium for 10 minutes or until liquid is almost absorbed. During the last 10 minutes, remove chicken. When it is cool enough to handle, remove meat, discard skin and bones and add shredded meat back into jambalaya. Add the shrimp and cook until heated through.

Oh, You’re Full o’ Beans: Tortilla Soup – Texas

Let’s talk about Tex-Mex, shall we? The term was coined in 1875 and initially referred to the Texas and Mexican Railroad. Some claim that the cradle of Tex-Mex food is San Antonio where Hispanic women, called “chili queens” began serving chili in the plazas in the 1880s. In

Tortilla Soup from Texas is comfort food at its best

the 1930s, several restaurant chains started and popularized the idea of the combo plate with rice and beans. Then in the 1970s, cookbook author Diana Kennedy asserted that Mexican food made north of the border wasn’t truly Mexican food at all. Even though she offended Texans who liked their nachos, fajitas and cheese enchiladas, she probably cemented the idea of regional dishes with big southwest flavors that came to be known as Tex-Mex.

We’ve been making tortilla soup for years and could probably do it while half-asleep, it’s that easy. Our little trick is to pulverize some tortilla chips in the food processor and add these when the veggies are almost done. They add a bit of texture and thicken up the soup nicely.

The last several times we cooked this soup, we made our own chicken stock by simmering bone-in chicken thighs with veggies (a quartered onion, celery, and carrot) and seasoning (salt, peppercorns, bay leaf) for about 40 minutes. But you don’t have to do this. Leftover chicken (rotisserie chicken is particularly good) and canned stock works just as well.

This recipe is easily adaptable. You don’t like heat? Leave out the jalapeno. You don’t eat meat? Make it vegan by leaving out the chicken and subbing vegetable stock.

If you make your way to San Antonio, remember the Alamo (literally), site of the 1836 battle between Mexican troops under President General Santa Anna and Texian defenders. Visitors can take in the shrine, visit the museum and walk the gardens.

Tortilla Soup

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 carrots, finely chopped
  • 1 rib celery, finely chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 medium red pepper, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, diced
  • 1 jalapeno, deveined and deseeded, finely diced (optional)
  • 1/2 cup corn tortilla chips, blitzed in food processor
  • 6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 15-oz. can fire roasted tomatoes
  • 1 cup salsa
  • 2 15-oz. cans of black beans, drained
  • 3-4 cups cooked, shredded chicken
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • Hot sauce for garnish (optional)
  • Chopped cilantro, chopped for garnish (optional)
  • Shredded cheddar cheese for garnish (optional)
  • Tortilla strips for garnish (optional)
  • Avocado or guacamole for garnish (optional)
  • Sour cream or Greek yogurt for garnish (optional)

 Instructions

Heat olive oil in large stock pot. Add carrots and sauté, 3-4 minutes. Add celery, onion, red pepper, garlic and jalapeno if using. Sauté 3-4 minutes or until onion is translucent. Add tortilla chips, continue cooking until soft. Add stock, tomatoes, salsa and black beans. Bring to a low boil. Reduce heat to low. Add chicken and season to taste with salt, pepper and cumin. Simmer 20 minutes or until vegetables are cooked through. Enjoy with your favorite toppings.

Summer Staple: Cobb Salad – California

The Cobb Salad was supposedly invented by the owner of the Brown Derby restaurant in Hollywood, California. Legend has it that late one night in the 1930s, Bob Cobb threw some leftover ingredients

Cobb Salad - CA

together to feed theatre owner Sid Grauman. Alas, the Brown Derby, with its kitschy architectural appeal (shaped like a brown derby hat, natch) is no longer, but fans of this delicious summer salad can easily make it at home. The beauty of the Cobb is that it’s readily customizable. If you’re vegan, sub in tofu and chick peas instead of the chicken, eggs, cheese and bacon. The traditional Cobb is great, but even better is adding some extra veggies like cukes or radishes. We’ve even tried it before with grilled shrimp and added some freshly shucked corn. See? Versatile!

If you want to see some amazing works of art, check out the 23rd Annual Pasadena Chalk Festival, June 20-21, 2015.

Cobb Salad

  • Servings: 3-4
  • Difficulty: easy
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 Ingredients

For the salad:

  • Romaine lettuce, half a head, rinsed and torn
  • 1 bunch watercress
  • 2-3 hard boiled eggs, diced
  • 4-6 pieces bacon, cooked and crumbled
  • 1/3 cup blue cheese, crumbled
  • 2 chicken breast halves, grilled or oven baked, cut in cubes (or sauted firm tofu)
  • 2 tomatoes, diced
  • 2 tablespoons chopped chives
  • 1 avocado, diced
  • 1 cup chick peas (optional)
  • Other vegetables (optional – carrots, celery cucumber, green onion, radishes, chopped)

For the vinaigrette:

  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 ½ tablespoons red vine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1/2 cup vegetable or olive oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Instructions

Make vinaigrette by placing all ingredients into a glass jar or cruet. Cover and shake well. Place romaine lettuce and watercress on serving plate. Add in rows egg, bacon, blue cheese, chicken, tomatoes and avocado. Sprinkle with chopped chives. Dress with vinaigrette. Serve immediately.

Broke Da Mouth: Chicken Long Rice – Hawaii

From the sandy shores of Waikiki on Oahu, to the summit of Haleakala on Maui, to the deep valley gorge of the Waimea Canyon on Kauai, the Hawaiian Islands are a sight to behold. The Aloha State, the nation’s fiftieth, has a unique culinary culture, with influences from China, Korea, Japan, the Philippines, and Portugal.

Chicken Long Rice - Hawaii

If you are invited to a  local’s home for dinner or attend a Hawaiian luau, you will likely be served Chicken Long Rice. Don’t look for rice in this dish, there is none. Long rice refers to cellophane noodles (also called mung bean noodles) which give this dish its distinctive Chinese flavor. We adapted a recipe from Doreen Fang and added julienned carrots for crunch and texture. Fang prefers Aloha Shoyu soy sauce which is a local soy sauce that tastes a little less salty and tangy than Chinese or Japanese soy sauce. Don’t worry if you can’t find it, just substitute reduced sodium soy sauce. If a dish is broke da mouth, that means it’s very delicious in Hawaiian pidgin. Yep, consider our mouths broke.

If you are a lucky enough to be headed to Hawaii, check out the Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau’s website which lists luaus on all of the islands. At luaus, the food is usually served buffet style and is a great place to try a number of authentic Hawaiian dishes.

Chicken Long Rice

  • Servings: 4-5
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

For marinade:

  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce (Aloha Shoyu brand preferred)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 teaspoons sugar

For chicken and noodles:

  • 6 ounces cellophane noodles (mung bean threads)
  • 1 ½ lbs. chicken breast, cut in strips
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 carrots, julienned (optional)
  • 3 ounces cremini or shitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 3 green onions, sliced and divided
  • 8 ounces chicken broth
  • Soy sauce to taste

Instructions

For the marinade: Combine all ingredients into a large bowl and mix with fork. Add sliced chicken. Marinate in the refrigerator for one hour.

For noodles: Place noodles in a large bowl. Cover with boiling water. Let stand ten minutes or until soft. Drain well. Chop into smaller pieces if desired. Set aside.

To finish: Heat saute pan or wok to medium heat. Add 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. When bead of water sizzles in the pan, add carrot. Cook until tender. Remove and set aside. Add 2 tablespoons of the oil. When hot, add marinated chicken. Cook for 6-8 minutes. Add mushrooms, and 2 green onions. Cook until chicken is cooked through. Add cellophane noodles, broth, soy sauce and carrot, tossing well to combine. Top with remaining green onion.

Whose Stew is it Anyway? Brunswick Stew – Virginia

Virginia is for lovers and we’re feeling the culinary love for Brunswick Stew.

Brunswick Stew - Virginia

 

Legend has it that Jimmy Matthews, a camp cook, created this stew for a hunting party back in 1828 on the banks of the Nottoway River. Other places have claimed Brunswick Stew as their own, most notably Brunswick, Georgia, spawning some serious stew wars. Georgia versions tend to have beef or pork as the protein while the Virginia version uses chicken. Thankfully for us, neither uses squirrel, the primary protein when the dish was created in the nineteenth century. This stew is hearty thanks to the addition of corn, potatoes and butterbeans, and the Brunswick Stewmaster’s Association asserts that it isn’t done until the spoon can stand up in the middle of the stew pot.

Brunswick Stew - Virginia

Head out to the Taste of Brunswick Festival in Alberta, Virginia, October 11, 2014, where you can sample lots of versions during the stew cook off.

Brunswick Stew

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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Recipe adapted from Brunswick Stewmaster’s Association, used with permission.

Ingredients

  • 6 bone-in chicken thighs, skin removed
  • 1 carrot, cut into large pieces
  • 1 stalk celery, cut into large pieces
  • 1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup chopped yellow onions
  • 3 medium potatoes, cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 1 can (28 oz.) crushed tomatoes
  • 2 cans (15 oz.) small butterbeans or lima beans, drained
  • 2 cans (7 oz.) white shoe peg corn, drained
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Vegetable oil

 Instructions

In a large pot, place chicken with enough water to cover it. Add carrot, celery peppercorns and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, then simmer until meat falls off bone, about 45 minutes. Remove chicken but reserve stock. Shred meat. In a separate pot, sauté the chopped onion in vegetable oil until translucent. Add meat, potatoes, tomatoes and salt and peppers, plus some of the stock to desired consistency. Simmer slowly, stirring often to prevent sticking, until potatoes are tender, approximately 30 minutes. Add additional stock if stew becomes too thick. Add butterbeans and corn, heat an additional 10 to15 minutes or until beans and corn are heated through. Season again with salt and peppers before serving.

 

 

Feel the Need for Spiedies – New York

Never heard of spiedies? That must mean you aren’t a native of the Southern Tier of New York, specifically Binghamton, where it is believed Italian immigrants introduced the famous marinated-meat sandwich in the 1920s. The name spiedie likely comes from the

Spiedies

Italian words for “spit” (as in rotisserie) and “skewer” – and accordingly, the sauced-up meat in spiedies (generally chicken, pork or lamb) is threaded on skewers, cooked on a barbecue grill and served on slices of soft Italian bread. You can buy commercial spiedies sauce as it’s called, but it’s very easy to make at home with Continue reading Feel the Need for Spiedies – New York

Just Plain Peachy Keen – Georgia

Georgia is a state chock-full of agricultural “P’s” – pecans, peanuts, poultry and its official state fruit, the beloved peach. It may surprise you that the peach received this designation only as recently as 1995 – even though its history in the state dates back to the 1500s, when Franciscan monks who had first planted peach trees in Florida brought them north to what is today coastal Georgia. We’re glad

Baked Chicken w Peaches

Continue reading Just Plain Peachy Keen – Georgia