Tag Archives: Christmas

Cookies, Cookies, Cookies!

Hello Friends!  How is your holiday baking going? Are you up to your elbows in flour and sugar? Or have you just started thinking about what you’d like to make?  Either way, we’ve got some StateEats sweets for you.

If peanut butter is your thing (and if not, why isn’t it??) check out  these Peanut Butter Buckeyes. These scrumptious morsels of

Peanut Butter Buckeyes - Ohio

peanut butter and chocolate are always a sure-fire winner. We   guarantee they will be snapped up quickly.

If you love cinnamon, you might want to make New Mexico’s state cookie, the Biscochito. In the Spanish culture, these cookies are

Biscochitos - New Mexico

often served after Las Posadas, where actors reenact Mary and Joseph looking for shelter for the birth of the Christ child.

If you enjoy yeasted cookies, check out Czech Kolaches. These take a little longer to make as you need to wait for the dough to rise but

Czeck Kolaches - South Dakota

they are so worth the time. Great with a cuppa tea while you write out your holiday cards.

If you favor cutesy cookies that resemble objects found in nature, then Nutmeg Log Cookies with Eggnog Icing are for you.  You can’t

Nutmeg Log Cookies with Eggnog Icing

beat the holiday flavors here of nutmeg and eggnog and your house will smell amazing as these bake.

Finally, if you have a gluten intolerance, and you still want something sweet for the holidays, try our Maple Cinnamon Walnut Meringues.

Maple Cinnamon Walnut Meringues - Vermont

Made with egg whites, maple syrup and some nuts and spices, these cookies are left in the oven overnight (with the oven off!) until crisp.

Enjoy and Happy Holidays!

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Nutmeg Log Cookies with Eggnog Icing – Connecticut

Connecticut’s unofficial nickname is the Nutmeg State. This comes from the alleged practice, in the 18th and 19th centuries, of shrewd Yankee peddlers who sold unsuspecting customers wooden nutmegs instead of real ones. Then again, some claim that certain less

Nutmeg Log Cookies with Eggnog Icing

culinary-inclined customers might not have realized that whole nutmeg (which indeed looks like a little wooden bead) needed to be grated to be used. Swindlers or not, the moniker stuck.

We consider ourselves to be cookie connoisseurs but we had never even heard of these Nutmeg Logs until a few weeks ago. They use a generous amount of nutmeg and make your house smell like all kinds of Christmas when you bake them. And nothing goes better with nutmeg than eggnog, thus the eggnog icing. The fun part is running the fork tines over the icing before it sets to create a log effect.

Visit the Mark Twain house in Hartford, a terrific example of American High Gothic style, where Twain lived from 1874 to 1891. One writer has described this house as “part steamboat, part medieval fortress and part cuckoo clock.”

Nutmeg Log Cookies with Eggnog Icing

  • Servings: 3 dozen
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Ingredients

For cookies:

  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour

For icing:

  • 1/4 cup butter, softened
  • 2 3/4 cups confectioners sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1-2 tablespoons eggnog
  • Ground nutmeg for topping

Instructions

For the cookies:

In the bowl of the electric mixer, add butter and sugar. Mix on medium speed until fluffy and light. Add egg and nutmeg. Mix until just combined. Add flour. Mix until incorporated. Take batter and divide into thirds. On a lightly floured surface, form dough into three logs approximately ½ inch in diameter. Cut each log into 3 inch pieces. Place on baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake at 350 degrees for 12 minutes or until cookies just begin to brown.

For the icing:

In the bowl of an electric mixer, add butter and confectioner’s sugar. Mix on medium speed. Add vanilla, then 1 tablespoon eggnog. If icing is too thick, add another tablespoon of eggnog until desired consistency is reached.

Once cookies are completely cooled, spread icing on cookies. Run the tines of a fork over the icing to make the “log.” Top with grated nutmeg. Let icing set before packaging cookies.

Good with Vino or a Cappuccino: Biscochitos – New Mexico

Hello friends! Is your holiday baking well underway? You might want add the biscochito (bis-ko-CHEE-toe) to your repertoire, New Mexico’s official state cookie. This melt in your mouth confection is

Biscochitos - New Mexico

flavored with anise, cinnamon and brandy and is often associated with Christmastime. In the Spanish culture, with the tradition of Las Posadas, where actors reenact Mary and Joseph looking for shelter for the birth of the Christ child, biscochitos are often served in the celebration following the event.

It seems every family thinks their abuela (grandmother) or tia (aunt) makes the best biscochito. Call us crazy, but our idea of fun would be to taste test biscochitos to come up with our favorite. This recipe is adapted from one found on the Albuquerque Convention and Visitors Bureau. This dough does get soft quickly so put it in the fridge when you are not working with it so it stays cold. And yes, equally delicious with a glass of wine or a cappuccino.

Celebrate New Year’s Eve on the Santa Fe Plaza, December 31, with bonfires, hot chocolate, music, food trucks and more.

Biscochitos

  • Servings: 4 dozen
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups shortening or lard
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons anise seeds
  • 4 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons brandy (can substitute apple juice)
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 3 tablespoons sugar

Instructions

 In a large mixing bowl, beat shortening and sugar with electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add eggs, anise seeds and brandy and beat until incorporated. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together. Gradually add to the shortening/sugar mixture, mixing until dough forms. Remove dough onto cellophane. Wrap and refrigerate for at least 3 hours.

To make cookies, roll out batches of dough (keeping unused dough refrigerated) to between 1/4 and 1/2 inch thickness. Cut with cookie cutters. Mix cinnamon and the 3 tablespoons of sugar on plate. Dip each cookie in cinnamon-sugar mixture on one side and place on cookie sheets. Bake at 350 for 10 minutes or until cookies are browned at the edges.