Tag Archives: eggs

Hawaiian Donuts: Leonard’s Bakery Malasadas

Malasadas are the Hawaiian donut you never met but will instantly love. Leonard’s Bakery in Honolulu has been making these sugary orbs of goodness since the 1950s. Originally a Portuguese

Malasadas - Hawaii

confection, these treats jumped two oceans as well as the vast expanse of North America when sugar cane and pineapple workers from Portugal immigrated to Hawaii. Created to celebrate Fat Tuesday, now you can find malasadas throughout the year and all over the Hawaiian Islands. If you are driving in Hawaii and see a food truck with a long line of people, pull a U-turn and check it out, they could be selling malasadas.

What makes malasadas different than donuts is the rich batter, fortified with eggs and half and half. The basic recipe we have used here from Leonard’s is plain sugar but on Hawaii you can find malasadas filled with all sorts of custards, including vanilla, chocolate and coconut. Super ono! Malasadas are a bit time consuming as they have to rise twice but if you make them, you will be the rock star of your household and neighborhood — if you dare give some away.

While in Hawaii, don’t miss the USS Arizona Memorial, including the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center. This is one of the most heavily visited sites in Hawaii and is a very moving memorial to the sailors and service people who died there.

Leonard’s Bakery Malasadas

  • Servings: 12
  • Time: 3 hrs.
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 1 package dry yeast
  • 1 ½ cups sugar, divided
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • ½ cup milk
  • ½ cup half and half
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups bread flour, sifted
  • Canola oil (for frying)

Instructions

Combine yeast,  one teaspoon sugar and two tablespoons of warm water in a small bowl. Set aside until foamy.

In the bowl of a stand mixture with the paddle attachment, beat eggs. Add yeast mixture, ½ cup sugar, butter, milk, half and half, and salt. Beat until combined. Add sifted flour gradually and mix until dough is smooth and elastic (it will be quite sticky). Transfer to a clean bowl coated with vegetable oil. Cover with a tea towel and let rise in a warm place for 90 minutes or until doubled in size.

On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into a 12-inch square, so the dough is about ½ inch thick. Cut the dough into 12 3-inch squares (alternatively, you can make smaller, round malasadas by cutting the dough into 24 pieces). Place each dough piece on an individual square of parchment paper on two baking sheets at least 3 inches apart. Cover with a tea towel and let rise in a warm place again, for approximately one hour.

Heat oil to 350 degrees. Place remaining sugar in a large mixing bowl. Working in batches, remove dough from parchment paper and drop gently into hot oil. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Toss in sugar when cool enough to handle. Serve while warm.

Ohio Shaker Lemon Pie

The Shakers were a Christian sect that began in Great Britain and made their way to the Northeast of the United States in the middle of the eighteen century. By the 1840s, several communities in Ohio

Ohio Lemon Shaker Pie

existed. Shakers were a very thrifty bunch and this pie presumably came about in an effort to use every part of the lemon. Yes, indeedy-doo, this pie uses the lemon pulp, the juice AND the skin. Use Meyer lemons as the flesh is sweeter than a regular lemon and the skin is more aromatic. The bitterness of the skin is tempered by the two cups of sugar that the lemons macerate with overnight. We have seen recipes for this pie with a top crust as well, but we liked the single crust version – all the better to see and taste the sunny yellow filling. Just the thing to brighten these gray winter days.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland is a mecca for rock aficionados. With five levels of exhibits including sound booths, interactive opportunities and a U2 3D film, this museum is not to be missed.

Ohio Shaker Lemon Pie

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Time: 1 hr.
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For crust:

  • 1¼ cup flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons shortening
  • 1/4 cup cold water

For filling:

  • 2 Meyer lemons
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Instructions

For crust: Place all ingredients except water in food processor and blend until fine crumbs are formed. Add water a little at a time until the dough is moist and forms a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap and place in fridge until ready to use. (Can be made a day ahead).

For filling: Over a medium mixing bowl to catch the juice, slice the lemons very thinly (can use a mandolin), discarding the ends. Reserve 3-5 slices of lemon for center of pie. Chop the remaining lemon slices into small pieces, then add to the mixing bowl, along with any lemon juice. Discard any visible seeds. Add 2 cups sugar and stir to combine. Let sit for at least 3 hours or overnight in fridge.

Roll out crust onto a floured surface. Gently lift onto a 9-inch pie plate. Finish edges by fluting or forking them.

Add beaten eggs and salt to lemon mixture. Add flour and vanilla and mix. Pour lemon mixture into pie crust. Array reserved lemon slices in center of pie.

Bake at 425 degrees for the first 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 325 degrees and bake for approximately 30 minutes more or until crust is golden brown, the pie is set and the filling is bubbly. If necessary, cover edge of crust with foil to prevent overbrowning. Let pie cool on a wire rack before serving.

New Mexico Green Chile Breakfast Skillet

We’ve talked before about how the chile pepper is the official state vegetable of New Mexico. The Aztecs cultivated these peppers centuries ago but Spanish settlers brought the chile pepper to the region from Mexico.

New Mexico Green Chile Breakfast Skillet

Green chile sauce is usually made with Hatch peppers which are grown in the Hatch Valley. If you can’t find fresh Hatch peppers, don’t fret. We subbed in Anaheim peppers, but poblano or even cubanelle peppers will also work. This sauce tops a savory breakfast skillet that is bursting with flavor. If you are vegan or vegetarian, use soy chorizo and /or leave out the eggs.

Hatch, New Mexico, is the self-proclaimed chile capital of the world and hosts a Chile Festival September 3-4, 2016.

New Mexico Green Chili Breakfast Skillet

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Time: 50 min.
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For Green Chile Sauce:

  • 2-3 green peppers (Hatch preferred, but we used Anaheim)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 1 tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup water
  • Salt

For Breakfast Skillet:

  • 2 -3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 pound baby potatoes, cubed
  • 6 ounces chorizo
  • 1 large tomato, chopped
  • 2 -3 eggs
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/2 cup cheddar or Monterey jack cheese
  • Half an avocado, diced
  • Hot sauce (optional)

Instructions

To make green chili sauce: Cut peppers in half. Flatten peppers with the heel of your hand. Roast under the broiler on a baking tray lined with foil, about 10 minutes until the skin is blistered brown. Remove from the oven and once cool enough to handle, place in a paper bag. Fold down the top of the bag and let sit for about 10 minutes. Remove peppers from bag. Remove stems, skin and seeds. Chop the peppers to ¼ inch dice. Heat olive oil in a heavy saucepan. Saute garlic and onion until onion is translucent. Blend in flour. Add water gradually, whisking to break up any clumps. Add peppers. Bring to a boil, then simmer for about 5 minutes. Add salt to taste. Set aside (Can be made a day ahead).

To make breakfast skillet: In a cast iron skillet over medium heat, add oil. Once heated, add diced potatoes. Cook until potatoes are browned, about 15 minutes. Remove to a plate and set aside. Add chopped tomato. Cook for about 5 minutes or until tomatoes are bubbling. Add chorizo to skillet. Cook until heated through, breaking up any clumps. Remove to a plate and set aside. Add diced potatoes back to skillet, then chorizo/tomato mixture. Make a well in the mixture and crack eggs into each well. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover skillet and cook eggs until yolk just begins to firm up, approximately 10 minutes. Uncover, top with cheese, avocado and green chili sauce. Season with hot sauce if desired.

Sugar-Dusted Goodness: Zeppole – New Jersey

Even though it was battered by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the Garden State is known for its beautiful shore. A favorite food from the boardwalks of Seaside or Wildwood is the delectable delight of sugar-coated fried dough known as zeppole. Also known as sfingi,

19 w label

zeppole are associated with the Feast of St. Joseph on March 19th, but they can be found year-round at family-run pizzerias, street fests and church festivals thanks to the state’s large Italian population. Many variations on the basic recipe exist: Some are filled or topped with a pastry cream; some are even savory with bits of chopped anchovy. We like the street fair version best, made with ricotta and dusted with powdered sugar.

Check out the Atlantic City Beer and Music Fest, March 20-22, 2015, featuring over 1,000 beers from 150 breweries.

Zeppole

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Time: 30 minutes
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup low-fat ricotta cheese
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Confectioners sugar for dusting
  • Vegetable oil for frying

Instructions

Mix dry ingredients first, then add egg, ricotta and vanilla, mixing just until the dry ingredients are incorporated. Batter should be sticky. In batches, drop by tablespoonful into oil heated to 375 degrees. Fry on both sides until golden brown, about 4 minutes. Remove with slotted spoon onto paper towels to drain excess oil. While still hot, place into a paper bag with confectioners sugar, close bag and shake. Remove and serve warm.

 

 

Plan for Dessert with Élan: Flan – Nevada

Nevada became a state in 1864, just a few days before the second election for Abraham Lincoln. The state founders wanted to make sure Nevada’s three electoral votes would be cast for the Republican incumbent.

Flan - Neveda

The Silver State has a long mining tradition. The Basque people — those from a region in Europe about the size of Rhode Island that includes both Spain and France — immigrated to Nevada and other parts of the west during the mid-nineteenth century. The Basques initially came to work in the gold and silver mines during the gold rush era but then decided shepherding was more lucrative. All of those silver and gold prospectors needed meat and wool to clothe themselves. In addition, the Basques set up boardinghouses across the state as way-stations for themselves. Today, the boardinghouses that remain are now restaurants.

The state still has a sizable Basque population and of course these people brought their food traditions with them from Europe. Flan is a Spanish custard made with eggs and milk. The shepherding Basques would have found it easy to make this dessert (probably with sheep’s milk) in the Dutch ovens they favored that they dug into pits in the ground. Our version here is a streamlined version of flan, adapted from Nigella Lawson that is so super easy you will wonder why you’ve never made it before.

Bundle up for the North Lake Tahoe Snow Fest, February 27-March 8, which includes parades, fireworks, a polar bear swim, a snow building contest and much more.

Flan

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 14 ounce can of sweetened condensed milk
  • 12 ounce can evaporated milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • Hot water

Instructions

In a small sauce pan, combine the sugar and water. Heat over medium high heat until the mixture caramelizes and almost reaches the color of maple syrup. Remove from heat and quickly pour into a 9-inch round pan, making sure the caramel covers the entire bottom of pan. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the sweetened condensed milk, the evaporated milk and the eggs. Beat or whisk until the eggs are fully incorporated into the milk. Add vanilla and mix until combined. Place the 9-inch pan with the caramel into a larger roasting pan. Pour the milk/egg mixture into the 9-inch pan on top of the caramel. Add the hot water into the roasting pan, to about one inch full. Very carefully place the nesting pans into a preheated 350 degree oven. Bake for about 45-50 minutes (the flan will be slightly brown on top but still quite jiggly. Do not overbake!). Remove 9-inch pan with flan from the water bath and let cool on the counter. Once very cool, invert the pan on a plate large enough to contain the caramel syrup.

 

 

 

Peace, Love and Spuds: Baked Eggs in Potato Cups – Idaho

Whether you bake, boil, mash, nuke or fry them, everyone loves potatoes. Idaho, sometimes called the Gem State, leads the states in potato production, with 14.2 billion pounds harvested in 2012.

Baked Eggs in Potato Cups - Idaho

Idaho’s rich volcanic soil and climate offer the ideal conditions for potatoes. Potatoes are a good choice for those who are gluten free. They are a good source of Vitamin C and an even greater source of potassium — even better than a banana.

This recipe is perfect for Sunday brunch and can easily be made vegetarian. We do not recommend using frozen hash browns as they will not brown up nicely. The only caution we note is to make sure you do not press too firmly against the bottom and sides of the pan when you are putting the grated potatoes in the muffin cups. If you do, the potatoes will stick to the pan.  😦  Spray or oil liberally, then use a light touch.

For kitschy fun and to take a picture with a giant potato in front (who could pass that up?), check out the Idaho Potato Museum in Blackfoot, ID.

Baked Eggs in Potato Cups

  • Servings: 12 cups
  • Time: 90 min.
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 3 medium baking potatoes
  • 6 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/4 cup red pepper, chopped
  • 1 cup Canadian bacon, chopped (can omit)
  • 1 cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 3 teaspoons fresh chives, minced
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Vegetable oil or cooking spray

Instructions

Bake potatoes at 400 degrees until almost done, about 40 minutes. Allow to cool, then grate. The potatoes should crunch a bit when you grate them which means they are just underdone. Season well with salt and pepper.

Increase oven temperature to 425 degrees. Spray or well oil the muffin pan. Scoop grated potatoes into the holes and onto sides, pressing very lightly (or potato cups will stick in the pan). Spray again lightly with cooking spray. Cook until potatoes are golden brown, but make sure edges do not burn, about 15-20 minutes.

In the meantime, while cups are baking, combine beaten eggs, chopped red pepper, cheddar cheese and Canadian bacon if using. Remove muffin pan from oven and spoon egg mixture evenly into the potato cups. Sprinkle tops with the chives. Return to oven for 15 minutes or until the eggs are set.