Tag Archives: Ohio

Ohio Shaker Lemon Pie

The Shakers were a Christian sect that began in Great Britain and made their way to the Northeast of the United States in the middle of the eighteen century. By the 1840s, several communities in Ohio

Ohio Lemon Shaker Pie

existed. Shakers were a very thrifty bunch and this pie presumably came about in an effort to use every part of the lemon. Yes, indeedy-doo, this pie uses the lemon pulp, the juice AND the skin. Use Meyer lemons as the flesh is sweeter than a regular lemon and the skin is more aromatic. The bitterness of the skin is tempered by the two cups of sugar that the lemons macerate with overnight. We have seen recipes for this pie with a top crust as well, but we liked the single crust version – all the better to see and taste the sunny yellow filling. Just the thing to brighten these gray winter days.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland is a mecca for rock aficionados. With five levels of exhibits including sound booths, interactive opportunities and a U2 3D film, this museum is not to be missed.

Ohio Shaker Lemon Pie

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Time: 1 hr.
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For crust:

  • 1¼ cup flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons shortening
  • 1/4 cup cold water

For filling:

  • 2 Meyer lemons
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Instructions

For crust: Place all ingredients except water in food processor and blend until fine crumbs are formed. Add water a little at a time until the dough is moist and forms a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap and place in fridge until ready to use. (Can be made a day ahead).

For filling: Over a medium mixing bowl to catch the juice, slice the lemons very thinly (can use a mandolin), discarding the ends. Reserve 3-5 slices of lemon for center of pie. Chop the remaining lemon slices into small pieces, then add to the mixing bowl, along with any lemon juice. Discard any visible seeds. Add 2 cups sugar and stir to combine. Let sit for at least 3 hours or overnight in fridge.

Roll out crust onto a floured surface. Gently lift onto a 9-inch pie plate. Finish edges by fluting or forking them.

Add beaten eggs and salt to lemon mixture. Add flour and vanilla and mix. Pour lemon mixture into pie crust. Array reserved lemon slices in center of pie.

Bake at 425 degrees for the first 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 325 degrees and bake for approximately 30 minutes more or until crust is golden brown, the pie is set and the filling is bubbly. If necessary, cover edge of crust with foil to prevent overbrowning. Let pie cool on a wire rack before serving.

Five-Way Any Day: Cincinnati Chili – Ohio

If you are a Buckeye, then you know Skyline Chili, the ubiquitous Cincinnati chain that began in 1949. Legend has it that the business got its name from the city view of the chili parlor’s original Glenway Avenue location. What makes Cincy chili unique is its distinctive

Cincinnati Chili

spices including cinnamon, allspice and cocoa powder, reminiscent of the Greek dish moussaka, not surprising given that the chain was founded by Nicholas Lambrinides, a Greek immigrant. Just as unique is that the chili is almost always served on a bed of spaghetti and fans know just how to order: either 3-way (chili with spaghetti and cheese); 4-way (chili with spaghetti and cheese and either onions or beans) or 5-way (chili with spaghetti, cheese, onions and beans). We’re a fan of the 5-way ourselves, but the beauty of Cincy Chili is that is entirely customizable. Put out bowls of cheese, onion and beans and let everyone help themselves.

If Queen City is your destination, don’t miss Findlay Market. On the National Register of Historic Places, the state’s oldest continuously operated market offers meat, fish, poultry, produce, cheese, and lots of dining options. In the summer months the market hosts a biergarten with live entertainment.

Cincinnati Chili

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Time: 90 min.
  • Difficulty: easy
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Recipe courtesy of Jessica Hudacek Ried

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 3 cups onion, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 3 pounds lamb, ground beef or ground turkey
  • 2 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoon allspice
  • 1 ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 4 2/3 cup beef broth
  • 1/3 cup tomato paste
  • 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 ½ tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • 2 15 oz. cans kidney beans, drained
  • Spaghetti
  • Chopped onion
  • Cheddar cheese

Instructions

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add onions and sauté until soft. Add meat, cooking until no longer pink. Add cocoa, allspice, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, and cumin. Stir in broth and then tomato paste, vinegar, chili powder, brown sugar, and Worcestershire sauce. Bring to boil, then reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer uncovered until thickened, about 1 hour. Season with salt and pepper. Heat beans separately, tossed with 2 tablespoons oil and seasoned with salt and pepper.

To serve, ladle chili over spaghetti. Top with beans, cheese, and onions or any combination thereof.

Oh, Hi Yo: Peanut Butter Buckeyes – Ohio

The Buckeye State got its name from the proliferation of Buckeye trees (Aesculus glabra) around the state, yes. But William Henry Harrison, the nation’s ninth president, also may have had a hand

Peanut Butter Buckeyes - Ohio

with the nickname as he used the image of the buckeye tree in his presidential campaign against Martin Van Buren. Besides Harrison, who was born in Virginia and later claimed Ohio as his home, seven other presidents are Ohio natives, which is why Ohio is sometimes called the “Mother of Presidents.”

Buckeye seeds are dark brown and shiny and have a lighter colored center that looks like a deer eye, according to native Americans.

Buckeyes

Naturally, someone clever eventually decided to make a confection that looks like the buckeye. You can now find these commercially made all over the state, but give this recipe a go. Homemade is always best.

Check out the Columbus International Festival, November 8-9, 2014.

Peanut Butter Buckeyes

  • Servings: 60 pieces
  • Time: 30 min.
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups creamy natural peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, softened
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups powdered sugar
  • 2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • Vegetable oil

Instructions

Mix the peanut butter and butter with an electric mixer until completely combined, approximately 3 minutes. Add salt and vanilla, mix again for 30 seconds. Add powdered sugar a half cup at a time, mixing and scraping down the sides of the bowl, until all sugar is incorporated.

Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Roll the peanut butter mixture into 1-inch balls and place evenly on the baking sheet. Place baking sheet into the freezer for the balls to firm up, about 15 minutes.

In the meantime, heat 1 cup of chocolate chips in 30 second bursts in the microwave, stirring in between until all the chips have melted. Add a bit of vegetable oil until the chocolate reaches desired consistency.

Remove baking sheet from the freezer. Place a toothpick in the peanut butter ball and dip about three-quarters of the ball into the chocolate. Place back on the baking sheet and remove toothpick, smoothing out the hole. Repeat with the remaining balls, melting more chocolate when it runs low. Refrigerate until firm.