Tag Archives: onion

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo – Louisiana

Louisiana declared gumbo as its state cuisine in 2004. Some scholars think gumbo might have been around as early as the 18th century. The word “gumbo” comes from the West African word for okra, “ki ngombo,” as okra was often used in this dish as a thickening agent.

This rich stew starts with a roux (flour and oil/butter), followed by  what Louisianans lovingly refer to as the “trinity” (onions, peppers

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo - Louisiana and celery). From there, variations abound: some are heavy on the seafood, some favor chicken or pork, and there is even a vegetable version for Lent.

We’ve brought you an adaptation of Emeril Lagasse’s gumbo recipe. We have made it too many times to count. Don’t be intimidated by the amount of time it takes to make, most of it is hands-off and it makes a TON. You can thank us later for the leftovers. You can find filé powder in the international aisle at most large grocery stores or online.

This weekend down in NOLA, parades from the so-called “super krewes” of Orpheus, Bacchus and Endymion will take place, featuring the biggest and most elaborate floats. Check out www.mardigrasneworleans.com for a full schedule.

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 4 lb. chicken thighs, skin removed
  • 1 tablespoon Creole seasoning
  • 1-2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 2 cups onion, chopped
  • 2 ribs of celery, chopped
  • 1 medium green pepper, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 lb. kielbasa sausage
  • 8 cups chicken broth
  • 1 tablespoon filé powder
  • 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • white rice (for serving)
  • hot sauce (for serving, optional)

Instructions

In a large pot, heat 1-2 tablespoons oil over medium heat. Rub chicken thighs with Creole seasoning. Working in batches, saute chicken in oil until it browns, about 5-6 minutes. With tongs, remove chicken to a plate and set aside. Add a ½ cup oil and flour to pot. Scrape up any browned bits on bottom of the pan. Cook roux until dark brown (the color of a tarnished penny), approximately 20 minutes. Add the vegetables and cook them for about 5 minutes. Add the salt, cayenne pepper, and bay leaves. Add the sausage and then the chicken broth. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook uncovered for about 1 hour. Add reserved chicken to the pot and cook for 1 to 1 ½ hours until chicken is tender and falling off the bone, occasionally skimming off the excess fat from the top of the gumbo.

Again with tongs, remove chicken from the stew to a clean plate. When cool enough to handle, remove meat from bones. Return meat to the gumbo, discarding the bones and fat. Stir in the filé powder, parsley and green onion. Adjust seasonings to taste. Best served over a scoop of white rice.

Recipe by Emeril Lagasse

 

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Peanut Soup – Virginia (V, GF)

We admit to loving anything with peanuts. And why not? Peanuts are a good source of protein and contain vitamins and minerals such as magnesium, potassium and Vitamin E.  Virginia peanuts are

Peanut Soup - Virginia

mostly grown in southeastern Virginia but also in the Carolinas. Virginia peanuts are prized because they are bigger than other types such as Spanish, Runner, and Valencia.

Most peanut soup recipes use peanut butter and add cream — not an option if one is vegan or lactose intolerant. But then we found this recipe from the Washington Post where the peanuts are soaked overnight. It was like the answer to all of our soup prayers. This earthy soup is perfect for these chilly fall evenings or football Sundays.

Great Falls National Park is just 15 miles from Washington, DC and boasts spectacular views of the waterfalls with three overlooks. Activities include biking, boating, hiking, and fishing.

Peanut Soup

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
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Recipe credit: Washington Post

Ingredients

  • 2 cups roasted, unsalted peanuts, covered with water and soaked overnight
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 2 ribs celery, diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 6 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/4 cup apple, diced (for garnish)
  • Dash of hot sauce (optional)

Instructions

Drain soaked peanuts, set aside. Place oil into large soup pot and heat over medium heat. Add onion and celery. Cook until onions are translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the drained peanuts. Add celery seed and bay leaf, cook on medium for about 2 minutes. Add broth. Turn heat to medium-high and cook until the soup begins to boil. Reduce to low and continue cooking about 25 minutes or until peanuts are quite soft. Remove bay leaf and let soup cool a bit.

With an immersion or stand blender, blend soup in small batches until desired consistency is reached. Return soup to the pot and add salt, pepper and lemon juice to taste. Heat through. Garnish with diced apple and hot sauce if desired.

Feast Away on Crawfish Etouffee – Louisiana

Yes, it’s true. At least one state has an official state crustacean. The Louisiana legislature bestowed this honor to the crawfish in 1983. Crawfish — also called mudbugs, crayfish or crawdads — look like

Crawfish Etouffee - Louisiana

mini lobsters but are the freshwater version. While crawfish are caught in the wild – with a season that runs from roughly December through June – Louisiana also has an established farming industry that provides more than 90 percent of the domestic supply.

If you’ve ever dined on crawfish, you know that its delicate, lobster-like tail meat is perfect in soups, stews, dips and the etouffee (French for “smothered”) recipe you see below. Keep in mind that if you’re buying whole crawfish rather than just the tails, your yield of meat is about 15 percent. Meaning, you’ll have to buy about 6 pounds to get 1 pound of meat. If you can’t find crawfish, you can substitute shrimp or even crab, and if you like it spicy, just up the amount of cayenne.

The Louisiana Crawfish Festival takes place March 26-29, 2015, in Chalmette.

Crawfish Etouffee

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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Recipe courtesy of www.cajundaughters.com, used with permission.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound peeled crawfish tails
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped fine
  • 1 large onion, chopped fine
  • 1/2 small bell pepper, chopped fine
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons chopped green onion tops
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 cup water

Instructions

Season tails with salt and pepper and set aside. Make roux with butter and flour, cook over medium heat until light brown. Add celery, onion, bell pepper and garlic. Cook until the onion becomes translucent. Add tails and sauté about 20 minutes. Add water and green onions and bring to a boil. Cook over low heat about 5 minutes. Add parsley and cook 5 more minutes. Season to taste. Serve over hot rice.

Okie Onion Burger – Oklahoma

The onion burger may be one of the best regional burgers you’ve never heard of. Until now. Legend has it that the onion burger was created in the 1920s by a man named Ross Davis at the Hamburger

Okie Onion Burger - Oklahoma

Inn in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Presumably, the onions were a way to stretch the meat in a tough economy. The onions get mashed into the beef and get nice and caramelized so that each bite is beef-n-onion heaven.

Okie Onion Burger - Oklahoma

The trick with this recipe is to slice the onions super thin, preferably on a mandolin if you have one. And the quantity of onions is not a typo, use about half an onion for each burger and feel the allium love.

Check out Downtown in December in Oklahoma City for ice skating, snow tubing, holiday lights, pop up shops and other winter fun.

Okie Onion Burgers

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • 2 medium onions, sliced very thin
  • Vegetable oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 4-6 burger buns
  • Cheese (optional)
  • Sliced tomato and lettuce (optional)

Instructions

Divide beef into 4 or 6 balls. Heat a cast iron skillet until a bead of water sizzles on the surface. Add a small amount of oil. Add beef and press down until thin. Add about half an onion to each burger, pressing down until the onion is incorporated into the beef. Season with salt and pepper. Flip burger. Add cheese. Cook until onions are caramelized and beef is done, adding a bit oil if necessary. Place on a bun and add burger accompaniments of your choice.