Tag Archives: potatoes

UP Pasties – Michigan

The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is known for its pasties (pronounced pass-tee) which are meat pies, usually filled with potatoes, onions and carrots and sometimes rutabaga. The pasty

UP Pasties - Michigan

was brought to the UP by the Cornish who settled there to be copper miners. Much like it’s cousin, the pepperoni roll of West Virginia, the pasty was a quick, easy and filling meal that miners could pack for lunch. Bonus: it didn’t have to be heated to be delicious.

We loved this recipe, slighted adapted from one sent to us by reader Russell Primm. UP PastiesThe dough came together easily and the filling was delicious. Thanks Russ!

Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore in Munising hugs the shore of Lake Superior. With its dramatic sandstone cliffs and iconic sandstone feature called Miners Castle, this beautiful area offers all kinds of outdoor pursuits including hiking, fishing, swimming, and kayaking.

UP Pasties

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For dough:

  • 4 cups flour, sifted
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 cup shortening
  • 1/2 cup ice water

For filling:

  • 1 1/2 cups potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 1/2 cups onions, diced
  • 1 cup grated rutabaga
  • 1 cup carrots, peeled and diced
  • 2 cups ground beef
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Instructions

For dough:

In a medium bowl, add flour, salt, and baking powder. Add the shortening and blend with a pastry blender. Add the ice water, a bit at a time until the dough comes together. Divide dough into 6 equal disks. Place between sheets of waxed paper. Chill in refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.

For filling and finishing pasties:

In the meantime, combine potatoes, onion, rutabaga and carrots in a very large bowl. Add ground beef. Stir until well combined.

Roll out each pasty dough into a 7- or 8-inch circle. Add a heaping cup of filling. Sprinkle filling with salt and pepper and a teaspoon of butter. Fold the dough over, forming a half moon. Roll the edges closed, slightly crimping with fingers, making sure the dough is sealed. Repeat with remaining dough disks. Place pasties on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cut two small slits in each pasty to vent steam. Bake at 425 degrees for 20-30 minutes, then reduce heat to 350 degrees. Bake 20-30 more or until pasties are golden brown.

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Chicken Vesuvio – Illinois

We’ve lived in the Chicago area for almost 20 years and have come across some delicious versions of Chicken Vesuvio. Harry Caray’s makes a mean version that they assert dates back to the 1920s, as does the venerable Gene & Georgetti. Although some people argue

Chicken Vesuvio

that Chicken Vesuvio has its roots in New York, New Jersey or even southern Italy, we are swayed by the claim that this dish was invented at Vesuvio Restaurant which was located on Wacker Drive in the 1930s. That, and the fact that we never heard of this dish until we moved here.

The components of Chicken Vesuvio are pretty straightforward. Bone-in chicken pieces are pan seared. Potatoes are added, usually with a generous amount of garlic. Oregano (or some other herb, sometimes rosemary) is sprinkled throughout the dish, and a white wine sauce melds all the flavors together. Sometimes additional vegetables are added, like mushroom (like we did) or artichokes. The dish is finished in the oven and peas are added at the last moment. Where ever it came from, no one can argue that this dish is delicious at every bite.

Hurry to get your tickets for Chicago Gourmet 2016, September 24-25, 2016. This premier food festival has an impressive array of celebrity chefs, cooking demonstrations and tastings.

Chicken Vesuvio

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

    • 1/2 cup olive oil, divided
    • 3 potatoes, quartered and then sliced 1/4 inch thick
    • 5-6 garlic cloves, minced
    • Salt
    • Pepper
    • 3 pounds chicken pieces, bone in
    • 8-10 baby portabella mushrooms, quartered
    • 3/4 cup white wine
    • 3/4 cup chicken stock
    • 2-3 teaspoons oregano
    • 1 cup frozen peas

Instructions

In a large, oven proof pan, heat ¼ cup of the cup of olive oil over medium heat. Add potatoes and garlic and cook until browned. Remove to a plate and set aside.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Season chicken pieces with salt and pepper. Add ¼ cup olive oil to pan. Working in batches if necessary, add chicken pieces. Cook skin side down until browned. Turn skin side up, then add mushrooms. Cook 3-4 minutes or until mushrooms are browned. Return potatoes to the pan. Add stock, wine and oregano. Cook until liquid is reduced by half.

Place pan in oven to finish, about 40 minutes. Add the frozen peas during the last five minutes of baking.

New Mexico Green Chile Breakfast Skillet

We’ve talked before about how the chile pepper is the official state vegetable of New Mexico. The Aztecs cultivated these peppers centuries ago but Spanish settlers brought the chile pepper to the region from Mexico.

New Mexico Green Chile Breakfast Skillet

Green chile sauce is usually made with Hatch peppers which are grown in the Hatch Valley. If you can’t find fresh Hatch peppers, don’t fret. We subbed in Anaheim peppers, but poblano or even cubanelle peppers will also work. This sauce tops a savory breakfast skillet that is bursting with flavor. If you are vegan or vegetarian, use soy chorizo and /or leave out the eggs.

Hatch, New Mexico, is the self-proclaimed chile capital of the world and hosts a Chile Festival September 3-4, 2016.

New Mexico Green Chili Breakfast Skillet

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For Green Chile Sauce:

  • 2-3 green peppers (Hatch preferred, but we used Anaheim)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 1 tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup water
  • Salt

For Breakfast Skillet:

  • 2 -3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 pound baby potatoes, cubed
  • 6 ounces chorizo
  • 1 large tomato, chopped
  • 2 -3 eggs
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/2 cup cheddar or Monterey jack cheese
  • Half an avocado, diced
  • Hot sauce (optional)

Instructions

To make green chili sauce: Cut peppers in half. Flatten peppers with the heel of your hand. Roast under the broiler on a baking tray lined with foil, about 10 minutes until the skin is blistered brown. Remove from the oven and once cool enough to handle, place in a paper bag. Fold down the top of the bag and let sit for about 10 minutes. Remove peppers from bag. Remove stems, skin and seeds. Chop the peppers to ¼ inch dice. Heat olive oil in a heavy saucepan. Saute garlic and onion until onion is translucent. Blend in flour. Add water gradually, whisking to break up any clumps. Add peppers. Bring to a boil, then simmer for about 5 minutes. Add salt to taste. Set aside (Can be made a day ahead).

To make breakfast skillet: In a cast iron skillet over medium heat, add oil. Once heated, add diced potatoes. Cook until potatoes are browned, about 15 minutes. Remove to a plate and set aside. Add chopped tomato. Cook for about 5 minutes or until tomatoes are bubbling. Add chorizo to skillet. Cook until heated through, breaking up any clumps. Remove to a plate and set aside. Add diced potatoes back to skillet, then chorizo/tomato mixture. Make a well in the mixture and crack eggs into each well. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover skillet and cook eggs until yolk just begins to firm up, approximately 10 minutes. Uncover, top with cheese, avocado and green chili sauce. Season with hot sauce if desired.

Get the Skinny: Pizza Potato Skins – Idaho

Idaho’s most famous export is the potato. The Gem State leads the states in potato production, with 13.1 billion pounds harvested in

Pizza Potato Skins - Idaho

2013. Potatoes get a bad rap nutritionally but they are actually high in potassium and Vitamin C — providing almost half the recommended daily value.

We confess to being slightly addicted to potato skins. We decided to revisit the traditional recipe of bacon and cheddar. Our take uses common pizza ingredients for a fun twist on a classic.

There’s just a few more weekends for you to catch WalkAbout-Boise, a 90 minute guided walking tour through 150 years of history and architecture.

Pizza Potato Skins

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 4 medium baking potatoes
  • 1/2 pound bulk sausage, mild or spicy, cooked through
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons basil pesto
  • 2 Roma tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 cups mozzarella cheese, grated
  • 1 tablespoon parsley, minced
  • Pizza sauce

Instructions

Bake potatoes at 350 degrees until done, about 1 hour. Allow to cool. Slice potatoes in half. Scoop out the potatoes, leaving about 1/8 inch of flesh. Reserve flesh for another use.

Place potato skins on a baking sheet. Combine sausage, pesto, tomatoes and a cup and a half of the cheese in a large bowl. Scoop filling back into skins. Top with remaining half cup of cheese and then parsley. Heat under boiler set to high until cheese is melted and bubbly. Serve immediately with pizza sauce.

 

Spuds to Die For: Three Cheese Funeral Potatoes – Utah

We admit, we were a little taken aback when we heard about funeral potatoes. Apparently, they have a long history in the Beehive State, heavily influenced by the Latter Day Saint tradition of hosting potluck dinners after funerals. Truly, this is comfort food.

Three Cheese Funeral Potatoes

Endless versions of this recipe exist, some with frozen hash browns and American cheese, others with sour cream or cream of chicken soup, some topped with crushed potato chips or Ritz crackers. As usual, we opted for a version with less processed ingredients, using fresh Idaho potatoes and cheddar, parmesan and manchego cheeses. But use whatever cheeses you like best, it’s all good. This dish is so beloved in Utah, it has spawned a cook-off at the Utah State Fair.

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Three Cheese Funeral Potatoes

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. Idaho potatoes, peeled and cut into bite sized pieces
  • 1/2 stick butter
  • 2 heaping tablespoons flour
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 1 1/2 cups cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup manchego cheese
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 3/4 cup crushed cornflakes or panko

Instructions

Place the potatoes in a large pot. Add water until potatoes are covered. Add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil until the potatoes are fork tender but not falling apart. Drain. Place potatoes into a greased, ovenproof casserole dish.

In a large saucepan, melt half of the butter. On medium heat add the onions and cook until translucent. Add the flour, and whisk vigorously to make a roux. Slowly add the milk, continuing to whisk until the mixture thickens slightly. Stir in the cheeses until melted. If cheese sauce is too thick, add in a bit more milk. Add salt and pepper to taste. Pour cheese sauce over the potatoes, stirring slightly so sauce covers all the potatoes.

Place the remaining butter in a small bowl and microwave until melted. Add crushed cornflakes or panko. Spread on top of the potatoes. Bake for 30-40 minutes at 350 degrees until potatoes are bubbling and topping is golden brown.

Chow Down on Chowdah: New England Clam Chowder – New Hampshire

After a brisk day of hiking in New Hampshire’s White Mountains, nothing could be more inviting than a nice, hot bowl of clam

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chowdah. You can find good clam chowder at any clam shanty up and down the Eastern Seaboard, but New Hampshire has an especially strong connection to the rich, creamy soup because it’s one of the first places in the New World to have successfully cultivated potatoes, according to the National Potato Council. In the recipe we’re featuring, we used fresh clams, and it absolutely makes a difference in bringing out a bright, briny clam flavor. If you’ve never steamed clams before, don’t worry – it’s easy. Soak the clams so they filter out the excess salt and sand, then brush them well; then in a large pot bring a few cups of water to a boil along with onion and celery trimmings. Add the clams, cover and let steam until these babies open. You don’t want to overcook them; they’ll cook a little longer in the soup. Use red potatoes which are waxier and hold their shape better than the white variety. The rest is super easy: If you can fry bacon, you can manage. As they say in Manchester, mmm, mmm, wicked good!

Support local artisans and crafters at the Downtown Holiday Market in Manchester, December 11, 13 and 18, 2014.

New England Clam Chowder

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 3 to 4 pounds littleneck clams (yields approx. 1 cup of clam meat = approx. 30 clams)
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1/3 pound bacon
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 3/4 cup reserved clam cooking liquid
  • 1 cup bottled clam juice
  • 1 3/4 cup water
  • 6 to 8 small red potatoes, diced medium
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream

Instructions

To steam clams: Pick through clams and discard any with cracked or damaged shells. Soak for 20 minutes in fresh water. Lift them out of the water bath (do not strain) and brush them vigorously to get rid of any excess sand. Heat 3 to 4 cups of water in a large pot with onion and celery trimmings until slowly boiling. Turn down heat to medium. Add clams and cover. Steam about 4 to 6 minutes or until the shells start to open. Remove from heat and let cool. Discard any clams that do not open. Once shells are cool enough to handle, open shells, extract and chop meat coarsely. Reserve the cooking liquid.

To finish chowder: Fry bacon until it’s crisp. Remove bacon, add onion and celery. Cook until onion is translucent. When bacon is cool enough to handle, chop and return to pot. Add flour and cook, stirring constantly, 2 to 3 minutes. Add ¾ cup of the reserved clam cooking liquid (skimming off the top to avoid sand from the bottom of the pot), bottled clam juice, water and potatoes. Add salt, pepper and thyme. Bring to boil, then reduce to medium. Add chopped clams and simmer until potatoes are tender, approximately 25 minutes. Finish with cream, adjusting seasonings to taste.