Tag Archives: South Carolina

Grilled Pimento Cheese Sandwiches – South Carolina

If you are in need of comfort, nothing is more soothing than a bowl of tomato soup and grilled cheese. We recently saw grilled pimento

Grilled Pimento Cheese- South Carolina

cheese as a menu item at a fancy sandwich shop and thought it was genius.

We’ve talked before about how pimento cheese spread did not become a home prepared item until after WWII. This delicious cheese dip can be made as zippy as you want with the addition of hot sauce. Spread between slices of sturdy bread and grilled until the cheese is oozing and melted, this is the definition of a culinary hug.

Congaree National Park, near Hopkins, encompasses almost 27,000 acres and is a designated Wilderness Area, an International Biosphere Reserve, a Globally Important Bird Area and a National Natural Landmark. The largest intact expanse of old growth bottomland hardwood forest remaining in the southeastern United States is its claim to fame.

Grilled Pimento Cheese Sandwiches

  • Servings: 3
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup grated Monterey Jack cheese
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 ounces pimentos, drained
  • 1/4 teaspoon Worchester sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Dash of hot sauce (optional)
  • 6 slices sturdy seeded Italian bread

Instructions

In the bowl of a food processor, add first six ingredients. Pulse until combined. Season with salt and pepper and hot sauce, if desired.

Divide mixture evenly on 3 slices of Italian bread. Place top on each sandwich. Butter each side of bread. Grill sandwiches in a hot pan on each side until golden brown and cheese is melted.

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Hoppin’ John – South Carolina

The year 2016 is just about one for the history books. What better way to ring in 2017 than with a heapin’ plate of Hoppin’ John. This classic Southern dish — which is really just gussied up black eyed

Hoppin' John - South Carolina

peas — is associated with New Year’s Day. Those who eat Hoppin’ John on January 1 will have good luck for the coming year, or so the legend goes. Often served with corn bread and collard greens, the peas represent coins, the corn bread represents gold and the greens, dollars or “greenbacks.” Some families add a coin to the pot while the peas are cooking, while others put a coin under each person’s plate.

Others say if you leave three peas on your plate, riches will come your way. Far be it from us to argue with potential wealth, especially when it’s this delicious. Hoping your 2017 is filled to the brim with all that is good.

Fort Sumter is in the middle of Charleston Harbor and is the site of where America’s Civil War began in 1861. Accessible only by boat, this former military post is now a national park.

Hoppin’ John

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 1 lb. dried black eyed peas
  • Olive oil
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1-2 stalks of celery, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 ham bone
  • 4-6 cups chicken stock
  • Bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • Cayenne pepper to taste (optional)
  • 2-3 scallions, chopped (to serve)
  • Tomato, chopped (to serve)

Instructions

Soak black eyed peas in water overnight, making sure that peas are covered by an inch or two of water. The next day, drain water and rinse peas well. Set aside. In a large pot over medium heat, add olive oil. When hot, add onion, red pepper, celery and garlic. Cook until onion is translucent and other vegetables have softened. Add peas, ham bone, chicken stock, bay leaf and thyme. Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer for about 45 or until peas are soft, adding more chicken stock if necessary. Remove ham bone and shave off any meat that remains on the bone, adding to pea mixture. Season with salt, pepper and/or cayenne. Serve over rice with chopped scallions and tomato.

All Hail the Power of the Pig: Pulled Pork Barbeque – North and South Carolina

If you live in the Southeast or have traveled there, you have some understanding of the popularity of pork on the lunch or dinner menu. And the way to prepare this little piggy? Why, barbequed, of course.

Pulled BBQ - North & South Carolina

We’re talking slow-cooked – often over a fire – ‘til the meat is tender and falls off the bone. The Carolinas sit right on the Barbeque Belt of the Southeast U.S. by virtue of history and tradition, bringing to the table distinctive variations that foster nothing short of regional fealty. The eastern region favors a vinegary pepper sauce, while barbeque lovers farther west incorporate more ketchup or tomato bases to their sauces. South Carolina meanwhile, adds an additional twist in the form of a mustard-based sauce reflective of the German immigrants who settled there. We offer a recipe for oven-roasted pork – a little easier for many of us than finding an outside pit – with your choice of Carolina finishing sauces.

You can find barbeque fests and competitions all over the Carolinas virtually every month. A couple of upcoming ones include the 6th Annual Bands, Brews and Barbeque competition in Port Royal, SC, February 27-28, 2015 and the 37th Annual Pig Cookin’ in Newport, NC, March 27-28, 2015.

North or South Carolina Pulled Pork Barbeque

  • Servings: 10-12
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For rub:

  • 2 tablespoons Spanish paprika
  • 2 tablespoons sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 3/4 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 3/4 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 3/4 tablespoon cumin
  • 3/4 tablespoon dry mustard
  • 5- to 7-pound pork shoulder
  • Hamburger buns

For North Carolina sauce:

  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
  • Salt to taste
  • Fresh ground pepper to taste

For South Carolina sauce (recipe courtesy of the South Carolina Barbeque Association, used with permission):

  • 1 cup mustard
  • 1/2 cup dark corn syrup
  • 2/3 cup ketchup
  • 1/3 cup vinegar (white, apple or wine)
  • 1 teaspoon dill weed
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 teaspoons liquid smoke
  • 1/2 tablespoon sorghum or molasses

Instructions

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Mix all spices for rub in a small bowl. Rub the mixture over the pork, covering meat completely.  Roast meat until meat thermometer reads 170 degrees and meat is falling off the bone, 3 to 4 hours. Remove from oven and let cool. With clean hands, pull pork from bone and shred meat with two forks. Add North or South Carolina Barbeque sauce. Serve on hamburger buns with coleslaw.