Tag Archives: sweetened condensed milk

Coconut Almond Brownie Bites – California

We love almonds and so does California. The Golden State produces about 80 percent of the world’s almonds and the entire U.S. supply.

A combo of brownies and Almond JoysAlmonds are one of the highest sources of Vitamin D and magnesium and are a tasty way to pack in some protein post-workout.

This recipe definitely falls into the indulgent category but we love the combo of almonds with coconut and chocolate. For a bit of a flavor boost, toast the almonds on a dry skillet on medium heat for 5 to 8 minutes, watching closely so that they do not burn.

Coconut Almond Brownie Bites

Coconut Almond Brownie Bites

  • Servings: 30
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients
• Brownie mix
• 1 ¼ cups sweetened coconut
• 1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk
• 4 tablespoons powdered sugar
• 30 almonds, toasted

Instructions
In a medium sized bowl, prepare brownie mix according to directions on box. Set aside. In a separate bowl, combine coconut, condensed milk and powdered sugar and mix until well combined. Add muffin liners to mini muffin trays. Add one teaspoon brownie batter, then two teaspoons coconut mixture. Add one almond and then top with one teaspoon brownie batter. Repeat to fill approximately 30 mini muffin cups. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 to 15 minutes. Let set for 2 to 3 minutes before removing from pan. Cool on wire rack.

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Pucker Up: Key Lime Pie – Florida

Key Lime Pie is one of those dishes that reminds you of that fun beach vacation every time you taste it. The official state pie of the Sunshine State since 2006, the origins of this pie are murky.

Key Lime Pie - Florida

Historians tend to agree that the recipe was created in order to push a new product called sweetened condensed milk which was brought to Florida in the 1850s by a ship salvager named William Curry. This canned milk was shelf stable, important for an area of the country that did not get refrigeration until the 1930s.

Folks like to quibble over the type of crust (regular or graham cracker?) and the type of topping (whipped cream or meringue?) but one thing everyone agrees to is that the filling must be light yellow and not green. We stuck with a pretty traditional recipe here, from Joe’s Stone Crab in Miami Beach, and we have to say, it’s the best we’ve tried.

Grab your old milk jugs and duct tape for the Anything That Floats Race in Key Largo, August 15, 2015. Homemade vessels rule in this race that awards the fastest teams, the best decorated boats and the best looking crew.

Key Lime Pie

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

For crust:

  • 1 sleeve graham crackers (or 1¼ cup graham cracker crumbs)
  • 5 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
  • 1/3 cup sugar

For filling:

  • 3 egg yolks
  • Zest from 2 limes, grated
  • 1 can (14 oz.) sweetened condensed milk
  • 2/3 cup fresh lime juice (use key limes if available, if not, use regular limes)
  • Whipped cream (optional)

Instructions

For crust: In the bowl of a food processor, add graham crackers, butter and sugar. Pulse until completely mixed. Press crust into a greased 9-inch pie pan, pressing firmly into the bottoms and sides of the pan with a bottom of a measuring cup. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 10-15 minutes or until crust just begins to brown. Remove and let cool.

For filling: Add egg yolks and lime zest into a large mixing bowl. Blend with an electric mixer on high speed, about 5 minutes. Mixture will expand and be frothy. Gradually add the sweetened condensed milk, beat about 5 minutes longer. Add lime juice and mix by hand. Pour into the cooled pie crust. Bake for 10-12 minutes at 350 degrees or until filling is set. Let cool, then refrigerate until ready to serve. Serve cold with whipped cream.

Plan for Dessert with Élan: Flan – Nevada

Nevada became a state in 1864, just a few days before the second election for Abraham Lincoln. The state founders wanted to make sure Nevada’s three electoral votes would be cast for the Republican incumbent.

Flan - Neveda

The Silver State has a long mining tradition. The Basque people — those from a region in Europe about the size of Rhode Island that includes both Spain and France — immigrated to Nevada and other parts of the west during the mid-nineteenth century. The Basques initially came to work in the gold and silver mines during the gold rush era but then decided shepherding was more lucrative. All of those silver and gold prospectors needed meat and wool to clothe themselves. In addition, the Basques set up boardinghouses across the state as way-stations for themselves. Today, the boardinghouses that remain are now restaurants.

The state still has a sizable Basque population and of course these people brought their food traditions with them from Europe. Flan is a Spanish custard made with eggs and milk. The shepherding Basques would have found it easy to make this dessert (probably with sheep’s milk) in the Dutch ovens they favored that they dug into pits in the ground. Our version here is a streamlined version of flan, adapted from Nigella Lawson that is so super easy you will wonder why you’ve never made it before.

Bundle up for the North Lake Tahoe Snow Fest, February 27-March 8, which includes parades, fireworks, a polar bear swim, a snow building contest and much more.

Flan

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 14 ounce can of sweetened condensed milk
  • 12 ounce can evaporated milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • Hot water

Instructions

In a small sauce pan, combine the sugar and water. Heat over medium high heat until the mixture caramelizes and almost reaches the color of maple syrup. Remove from heat and quickly pour into a 9-inch round pan, making sure the caramel covers the entire bottom of pan. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the sweetened condensed milk, the evaporated milk and the eggs. Beat or whisk until the eggs are fully incorporated into the milk. Add vanilla and mix until combined. Place the 9-inch pan with the caramel into a larger roasting pan. Pour the milk/egg mixture into the 9-inch pan on top of the caramel. Add the hot water into the roasting pan, to about one inch full. Very carefully place the nesting pans into a preheated 350 degree oven. Bake for about 45-50 minutes (the flan will be slightly brown on top but still quite jiggly. Do not overbake!). Remove 9-inch pan with flan from the water bath and let cool on the counter. Once very cool, invert the pan on a plate large enough to contain the caramel syrup.