Tag Archives: swiss cheese

New Jersey Sloppy Joes

When you think of a Sloppy Joe, you probably imagine ground beef in a sweet tomato sauce. This is not that. New Jersey Sloppy Joes are a completely different animal. Town Hall Deli in South Orange

New Jersey Sloppy Joes

created this sandwich in 1935 and it came via Havana, Cuba. Seems the mayor of Maplewood, N.J. visited Sloppy Joe’s bar (a frequent hangout of Ernest Hemingway) and liked a kind of club sandwich they made there. The mayor came back home and persuaded the owners of Town Hall to recreate the sammie for their deli. It’s been on the menu ever since.

The key to this creation is thin sliced rye bread. You don’t want the bread to overwhelm the fillings. Originally this sandwich was made with beef tongue, but now is more often made with ham, roast beef, or corned beef, along with turkey. The crunch from the slaw and the savory/sweet flavors of the Russian dressing make this sandwich a mouthwatering delight.

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New Jersey Sloppy Joes

  • Servings: 2 sandwiches
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 6 slices rye bread, ends cut off and trimmed into rectangles
  • 2-3 ounces deli ham, corned beef, or roast beef
  • 2-3 ounces deli turkey
  • 2 ounces swiss cheese
  • Cole slaw
  • Russian dressing

Instructions

Lay 2 slices of bread on work surface. On each slice, layer a quarter of the meat and cheese, then a generous dollop of coleslaw and Russian dressing. Add another slice of bread and then repeat with another layer of meat, cheese, cole slaw, and Russian dressing. Top with bread and secure with a toothpick.

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Cubano Sandwich – Florida

Oh, Cubano sandwich, you make our hearts swoon. Besides being one of the best sandwich creations of all time, the Cubano sandwich has the distinct honor of hosting two types of pork. Before we get into the specifics, a little history.

Cubano sandwich - Florida

Miamians claim that the Cubano came from Cuba as it was on restaurant menus there dating back to the 1930s, but good evidence exists that it was created 25 years earlier in Ybor City, a Latin neighborhood in Tampa, at a place called the Columbia Restaurant, which claims to be Florida’s oldest restaurant. Tampa and Miami both have versions of this winning culinary creation. In Tampa, you will find the sandwich often includes salami, lettuce, tomato and mayo and is not pressed. In Miami, no salami and the sandwich is always pressed.

Our recipe here is a Miami version which is basically a gussied up toasted ham and cheese with both pork roast, ham, Swiss cheese, mustard and sliced dill pickles.  We used a bolillo which is a type of Mexican roll. Whatever roll you use, the exterior of it cannot be too hard or crunchy. Once the bread is compressed it will be too hard to chew. Also, make sure you put the cheese of both sides of the roll. When it melts, it will hold the other fillings in place. Don’t have a panini press? No problem. Just use your favorite skillet, and then take another heavy pan and place it on top of the sandwich. Press down on both with your hands to compress the sandwich by about a third.

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Cubano Sandwich

  • Servings: 1 sandwich
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 soft roll (like bolillo)
  • 3 teaspoons yellow mustard
  • 2 slices Swiss cheese
  • 3 ounces sliced deli ham or Canadian bacon
  • 3 ounces sliced roast pork
  • Dill pickle, sliced
  • Butter

 Instructions

Slice open the roll and spread mustard of both slides. Lay cheese on both sides. On one side, add ham, pork and then sliced pickles. Close sandwich and butter both sides. Using a hot griddle, a plancha or panini press, toast sandwich on both sides, pressing down slightly until sandwich is compressed, cheese is melted and bread is golden brown.